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OCD Research Participants Sought

The IOCDF is not affiliated with any of the following studies.

OCD Research Studies  

Online/Phone/Mail

Association-Splitting: A web-based study on a novel technique targeting obsessions
Children with OCD - Online Survey
Hoarding in Children and Teens - Phone Survey
OCD Rituals - Online Survey
Sleep Habits in Children - Online Survey
Repetitive Behaviors in Children With OCD - Online Survey
The Impact of Sibling Relationships on OCD - Online Survey
Quality of Life in Adults with OCD - Online Survey
How much do you care? Self-compassion in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Drexel University Study- Free Online Treatment for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Anonymous Online Survey on Body Movements in Adults with and without OCD
Study of Web-based Treatment for OCD
OCD and relationships
Romantic Partners’ and Adult Children’s Views: OCD and Relationships
Reactions to Hoarding
Take Part in a Psychology Research Study
Submissions Needed for Academic Book
Hypnosis and OCD
Study of Website to Improve Communications Between OCD Patients and Family
Hoarding/Clutter Online Study
Study on Child Anxiety and Family Functioning
The Nature of OCD Thoughts
Video Camera Treatment Study for Anxious Children and Teens
A Study of Sexual Worries and Cognitions
Online Child OCD Study
Parents of Adolescents with OCD – Online Survey
PANDAS-PANS-PITAND Online Retrospective Research Study Invitation
Shame and Self-Consciousness Study
The Impact of Hoarding Cleanouts
Individuals with either Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder or Hoarding Disorder Needed for Research Study
Volunteers wanted to help learn about Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Assisting Older Family Members with Medications — Online Survey
What type of treatments and services you find most acceptable for your difficulties with clutter?
Clinical Features of Body Dysmorphic Disorder – Online Survey
Mindfulness and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – Anonymous On-line Survey
Effects of Elaboration of Disastrous Consequences verses Cognitive Restructuring on Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Outcome
Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Treatment and Research Program
Mormons Who Present with Anxieties and Related Behaviors
Are you married? Do you or your spouse have OCD? 

Multiple Sites

Genetic Causes of OCD - Multiple Locations
Maximizing Treatment Outcomes in OCD - Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania
Does your child have OCD? Are you currently seeking treatment for your child?
Attaining and Maintaining Wellness in OCD
The Sertraline Pediatric RegIstry for The Evaluation of Safety (SPRITES)
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD
Yale OCD Research Clinic- Treatment Trial for Novel OCD Medication - New Haven, CT  

California

Neuroimaging Study of OCD - Stanford, CA
Tourette Syndrome Study - San Diego, CA
Neurobiology of OC Spectrum Disorders - San Diego, CA
OCD, BDD, Hoarding Study - San Diego, CA
Medications for OCD - Los Angeles, CA
Genetic Studies of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - San Francisco, CA
Neural Correlates of Compulsive Hoarding - San Francisco, CA
UCLA Research Opportunity for Kids and Teens with OCD
UCLA Research Study for Adults and Children with OCD
UCLA Research Study for Kids & Teens with OCD and Chronic Tic Disorders
Are you a: Packrat? Hoarder? Clutterer? - San Diego
Healthy females age 35-65 - San Diego
Treatment of Late Life Compulsive Hoarding
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for OCD
Are you concerned about your http://ocfoundation.org/Participants.aspxaps and OCD
Do you have a fear of vomiting?
Do you have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?
Comparison of Peer Facilitated Support Group and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hoarding Disorder
Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
 

Connecticut

OCD and Hoarding - Hartford, CT
Yale Child Study Center Seeks Research Participants- New Haven, CT
Yale OCD Research Clinic- PET Imaging Study- New Haven, CT
Yale OCD Research Clinic- OCD Treatment Study- New Haven, CT
Yale OCD Research Clinic- MRS Imaging Study- New Haven, CT
N-acetylcysteine for the Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  

Florida

Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Needed for Research Study
Does your child have OCD? Are you currently seeking treatment for your child?
Antibiotic Treatment Trial for the PANDAS/PANS Phenotype
OCD-TRAC Research Program: The Next Step Towards Improving Treatment Outcomes for Pediatric OCD  

Illinois  

Skin Picking Study
OCD Study  

Indiana  

Paliperidone study for adults with OCD - Indianapolis, IN

Kansas

Neuroimaging and OCD Study- Kansas City, KS  

Maryland  

Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections (PANDAS) Research Study for Children - Bethesda, MD  

Massachusetts

Hoarding - Boston, MA
Early Detection of Anxiety Disorders in Children - Boston, MA
Nutrition Intervention for Children with OCD - MA
Genetic Study for Tourette Syndrome, ADHD and OCD - Boston, MA
Medication Study for Body Dysmorphic Disorder - Boston, MA
An Open Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Body Dysmorphic Disorder- Boston, MA
Duloxetine for the Treatment of OCD- Boston, MA
Enhancing the Effectiveness of Behavior Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder- Boston, MA
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD
OCD Treatment Study for 4-8 year olds with OCD
Do you worry a lot about someone else's appearance?- Boston, MA
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Research Study
Suffer from OCD?
Parents with OCD Needed to Participate in Research Study
Biological and Environmental Risk Factors Associated with Children and Adolescents Who Hoard

Michigan

Imaging Genetics Study of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Group Therapy Imagining Study for Pediatric OCD

Minnesota

Do you have obsessive compulsive disorder?

New York
 

Children with OCD - North Shore/Long Island, NY
Body Dysmorphic Disorder and OCD - Great Neck, NY
Body Dysmorphic Disorder - Great Neck, NY
OCD in Children, Brain Imaging - New York, NY
Teenagers with OCD - New York, NY
Perception in BDD and OCD - Great Neck, NY
Investigating How OCD Works in the Brain - New York, NY
Understanding Obsessive Compulsive Personality Features - Manhattan, NY
Neuroimaging of Olfaction in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - New York, New York
Neural Correlates of Emotional Response Inhibition in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - New York, New York
Brain Imaging Research Study Seeks Adolescent Participants with OCD- New York, NY
Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)
Neurobehavioral Tasks in OCD
Mt. Sinai OCD Research Study
Attaining and Maintaining Wellness in OCD
Minocycline augmentation to serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Therapy- New York, NY
Brain Imaging Studies of OCD at Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Intravenous (IV) Ketamine in Treatment-Resistant OCD  

Ohio  

Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Needed for Family Assessment Study
Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Needed for Treatment Study  

Pennsylvania

African Americans and OCD - Philadelphia, PA
Do You Or Your Child Have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder? - Philadelphia
Attaining and Maintaining Wellness in OCD

Rhode Island

Are you diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive disorder?
Neuropsychology Comparison Group for OCD Study
DBS for OCD: Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD
Want support for coming off medication for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

Tennessee

Hoarding in Children and Adolescents - Germantown, TN  

South Carolina  

Neurostimulation and Behavior Therapy for Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder  

Texas  

Intimacy in the Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum

Wisconsin 

Developing Effective Response Inhibition Training for Symptom Relief in OCD and Trichotillomania
Hoarding Research Study 

Canada  

Anxiety Studies Participant Pool - Waterloo, Ontario
Do you suffer from OCD?  
Intimate Relationships and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder 


Biological and Environmental Risk Factors Associated with Children and Adolescents Who Hoard

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School are conducting a study to learn more about children and adolescents with hoarding behaviors:
Participation involves:

  • 4-6 hours of patient time, over 1 phone interview and 1 office visit
  • Payment up to $75

Inclusion criteria:

  • Between the ages of 8-17 years
  • Engages in saving and collecting behaviors or has difficulty discarding items

Exclusion Criteria

  • History of or current  psychosis, bipolar disorder, or current suicidality
  • History of of neurological disorder, impairment or organic brain damage
  • Psychiatric medications are not stable (as defined by remaining at the same dose for at least 2 months).

If you would like to learn more about this study, please contact Abigail Stark at 617-643-6204


Want support for coming off medication for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

The Tapering OCD Pharmacotherapy Support (TOPS) Study

Sick of taking medication for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

You may be eligible to participate in a FREE research study for adults with (OCD) who want to stop taking serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs).  This study is being conducted by researchers at Butler Hospital who are affiliated with the Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

TOPS study participants will receive 14 weeks of medication management and one of two 22-week programs designed to support individuals who want to stop SRI medication.

Participants may be compensated up to $100 for their time in completing interviews and questionnaires during, at the end, and 6 months following treatment.

All study appointments are held on the Butler Hospital campus in Providence, RI.

If you are interested in participating in TOPS, please visit the following website for more information or call (401) 455-6243.

www.butler.org/tops 


Are you married? Do you or your spouse have OCD?

If your answer is yes, then you may be eligible to participate in a paid study conducted by researchers at the University of Louisville.  Your responses may help therapists better understand how to help married couples in distress because of problems associated with OCD.  The payment for participating in this study is $25 ($50 per couple).  Your spouse will also have to complete a related questionnaire before you will receive compensation.  Click here for more information and to participate in the online paid survey.


Intravenous (IV) Ketamine in Treatment-Resistant OCD

This study aims to determine whether a single dose of intravenous (IV) ketamine can help reduce symptoms of treatment-resistant OCD.

Participants must be between the ages of 21 and 65 and must have failed at least two FDA approved medication trials (clomipramine or SSRIs such as Prozac or Zoloft) as well as a trial of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). The study will consist of two intravenous infusions—one of ketamine and another of the active control midazolam separated by two weeks. Psychiatric assessments will be performed before each infusion and several times after each infusion.

Participants will be compensated for their participation.

Participants will be allowed to continue FDA approved medications (clomipramine or SSRIs) and as needed benzodiazepines (such as Xanax or Valium) during the trial, but participants cannot be on unapproved medications for the duration of the trial.

 

Organization: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Principal Investigator: Wayne Goodman, MD

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Male or female patients, 21-65 years;
  • Women of childbearing potential must agree to use a medically accepted means of contraception for the duration of the study;
  • Primary diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder as assessed by SCID-P, with symptoms for at least 1 year;
  • History of a failure to respond to at least two (2) adequate pharmacotherapy trials and CBT for OCD (see above for definition for adequate trials);
  • Moderate to severe, treatment-resistant OCD.
  • Subjects must be able to identify a family member, physician, or friend who will participate in the Treatment Contract and serve as an emergency contact.

Exclusion Criteria 

  • Women who plan to become pregnant within the next six months, are pregnant or are breast-feeding;
  • Non-English speakers;
  • Any unstable medical condition;
  • Lifetime history of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, mental retardation, or pervasive developmental disorders;
  • Current presence of psychotic or manic symptoms;
  • Drug or alcohol abuse within the preceding 6 months;
  • Lifetime abuse or dependence to ketamine or phencyclidine;
  • Patients judged by study investigator to be at high risk for suicide;
  • Current use of psychotropics other than SSRIs or benzodiazepines as needed.

Contact:
For more information please contact Clinical Research Coordinator David Rosenthal at (212) 659-8803 or david.rosenthal@mssm.edu 

Location:
New York, NY


Developing Effective Response Inhibition Training for Symptom Relief in OCD and Trichotillomania

We are currently testing computer-based treatment programs designed to help adults (aged 18-60) suffering from problematic repetitive behaviors, including

  1. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  2. Compulsive hair pulling (Trichotillomania)

This research is conducted at the Psychology Training Clinic, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (sponsored by the NIMH). All study procedures will be completed in our clinic located within the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee campus. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of the two similar computer-based training conditions designed to help improve symptoms for individuals with OCD or Trichotillomania. As the first step of the study, we will conduct a pre-screening assessment to determine whether the person is eligible for the study. Our computer- based treatment program is provided at no cost for eligible participants, and each participant will receive compensation for completing the study.

If you are interested in our study, please contact us at (414) 416-4249, or leehj@uwm.edu for more details about the study.


Intimate Relationships and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Do you or your partner have OCD?  

Do you feel you or your partner’s quality of life is significantly impacted by OCD?

Would you like to engage in treatment that may help you to better cope as a couple?

Researchers at York University and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Canada are currently seeking individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and their partners to participate in a treatment study. 

If you and your partner are between 18 and 65 years of age, are FLUENT in English, and either you or your partner suffer from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder you may be eligible. 

The purpose of this research is to better understand the nature of OCD in committed relationships, while also investigating a couple’s therapy which is designed to help you and your partner cope with OCD and related issues.  

You can receive 7 weeks of free treatment, and help others through your participation.

TO LEARN MORE CONTACT US AT:

416-504-6957 or rsiegal@yorku.ca 


Mormons Who Present with Anxieties and Related Behaviors

Intrusive Worries, Related Behaviors, and Religious Beliefs Among Mormons 

Michelle Medeiros, a psychology graduate student, under the supervision of Sita Patel, Ph.D., both from the Pacific Graduate School of Psychology at Palo Alto University, is conducting a study to learn worries Mormons have, how they respond to those worries, how particular they are about moral values, and their images of and beliefs about God. The researcher hopes that the information learned from this study could assist mental health professionals and religious leaders understand how Mormons present anxieties and related behaviors. Adults of all ages (18 years and older) who are Mormons are encouraged to participate. 

If you choose to participate, you will be asked to answer questions about your demographic information, psychiatric history, religious beliefs and involvement. You will be able to take the questionnaire online, in the comfort of your own home. Your individual responses will be kept completely confidential. Participation in this study will take approximately 30 to 45 minutes.

If you choose to participate, you will have an opportunity to win a $50, $75, or $100.00 Visa gift card. The lottery drawing will take place in September 2014.

If you are interested in participating in this study please send an email to: worries2014@gmail.com or call 408-829-0887. 

To access the study, go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/worries123  

 


Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Have you been diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?
We invite you to join an international research study sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health. The goal of the study is to identify genes that may be related to OCD. Scientists and physicians at the University of Southern California are leading this work. Participation involves the completion of questionnaires and a one-time visit to USC for an interview and donation of a small blood sample (about 3 tablespoons).
If you would like to participate, please click on the link below. You will be asked to read and agree to our Informed Consent and to complete our on-line questionnaire. This questionnaire should take between 15 and 40 minutes to complete and will ask general questions about you and specific questions about your health and medical history. For more information, please contact us at (323) 863-3995.
Take as much time as you need and please remember:

  • All information will be kept strictly confidential.
  • No information will be given out that might identify you.
  • If you decide to participate in our genetic study, AFTER you complete the on-line questionnaire we will contact you to schedule a time for you to come to our office.
  • You may be compensated for your time.

Recent Publications:

For more study information, please go to the following website keck.usc.edu/gpc-ocd  


Effects of Elaboration of Disastrous Consequences verses Cognitive Restructuring on Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Outcome

OCD CONTAMINATION TREATMENT STUDY

Do your obsessions and compulsions focus on germs or dirt?  

The Bio Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY is currently conducting a study comparing variations of exposure and response prevention therapy for individuals with contamination OCD.

Currently, the study is open to individuals who:

  1. are 18 years of age or older.
  2. suffer with primarily contamination-related obsessions and compulsions (i.e., the symptoms focus primarily on dirt or germs)
  3. have not experienced any changes in medication in the past 3 months.
  4. are not currently involved in any other treatment (i.e., ERP, supportive, psychodynamic, etc.) Or are willing to temporarily suspend current treatment for the duration of the study (8 weeks).

If interested, please contact Jennifer Wilson at (516) 487-7116.


Mindfulness and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – Anonymous On-line Survey

This on-line study is investigating the relationship between Obsessive and Compulsive thoughts and behaviours; and Mindfulness.

Anyone who is 18 years and over, and is not currently receiving treatment for a mental health disorder and/or alcohol and drug abuse/dependence, is eligible to participate.

Participation is anonymous and the on-line survey should take about 20 minutes to complete.

If you feel you might be interested in taking part, please follow the link below (click on the link or copy and paste the link into your web browser), which will take you to the e-survey on the host university website. Full information about the study is detailed on the e-survey Information Page.

This research is being conducted by Elisabeth Bakes, Doctor of Clinical Psychology student (University of Essex), as part of a doctoral thesis, and has been approved by the Faculty of Health and Human Sciences Ethics committee at the University of Essex.

Thank you for considering this research. Your participation will contribute to our knowledge about what influences obsessive and compulsive thoughts and behaviours.

Study weblink https://moodle.essex.ac.uk/mod/feedback/view.php?id=182822  


Clinical Features of Body Dysmorphic Disorder – Online Survey

We are looking for volunteers who

  • Have, or think they may have body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)
  • Are at least 18 years old
  • Are interested in answering some questions about their concerns and how they affect their lives

Your participation may help to better understand BDD and its associated features, which – in turn – may help develop innovative treatment concepts for BDD. This study will take about 30 minutes to complete and you can choose to discontinue your study participation at any time.

If you would like to participate follow the link below:
https://www.unipark.de/uc/bdd/emoreg/  

If you have any questions or comments, you can email us at bddresearch@wwu.de.

The principal investigator of this study is Prof. Dr. Ulrike Buhlmann at Westfälische Wilhelms- Universität Münster, Germany. This survey has undergone ethical review in accord with the guidelines of the Institutional Review Board of the Faculty of Psychology and Sports Science at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, and has been approved by its Faculty Ethics Committee. All data collected will be kept completely confidential, and the survey is completely anonymous (that is, no identifying information such as your name or email address will be collected).


Comparison of Peer Facilitated Support Group and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hoarding Disorder

Researchers at the University of California San Francisco and the Mental Health Association of San Francisco are conducting a study to learn more about different treatments for people with problematic hoarding and cluttering or Hoarding Disorder.

Participants of this study will be asked to commit to 16 group sessions, 2 hours in length, over the span of 20 weeks. Before and after receiving the 20-week treatment, participants will complete surveys, diagnostic interviews, and cognitive assessment at the Parnassus campus of UCSF. Payment for participation is $100.

You may be eligible to participate in this study if you are 18 years or older, you have problematic hoarding or cluttering or Hoarding Disorder, and have not received cognitive-behavioral treatment for this problem in the last 12 months.

If you would like to learn more about this study, please contact: Ofilio Vigil at 415- 476-7732 or ofilio.vigil@ucsf.edu  


Parents with OCD Needed to Participate in Research Study

If you are a parent with OCD and have a child or children between the ages of 8-18, you may be eligible to take part in a research study at the Massachusetts General Hospital. We are studying the thinking stlyes of parents with OCD and those of their children.

Your participation will include 1 phone visit (45-90 minutes) and 1 clinic visit (approximately 60-90 minutes). The research study visits involve assessments of you and your child(ren). Assessments are comprised of three components, including: 1) diagnostic interviews with the parent with OCD about him/herself and his/her eligible children, 2) questionnaires completed by parents and children about various psychological experiences, and 3) cognitive asessments of parents and children in the clinic on the MGH campus. The parent will receive a $50 gift card for completing the diagnostic interviews and each family member that attends the clinic visit will receive an additional $25 gift card. If the family drives, parking will also be reimbursed.

In-person study visits will take place at our clinic at MGH in Boston. For more information, or if you’re interested in taking part in the study, please contact Natalie at 617-724-4354 or nmatheny@partners.org.


Suffer from OCD?

Do you or does someone you know suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder?

Adams Clinical Trials is conducting a study of an investigational medicine in adults with OCD.

Participants may be compensated up to $100 per completed visit in the 14 visit study.

Please call (617)387-1706 or visit adamsclinical.com to learn more or sign up.


What type of treatments and services you find most acceptable for your difficulties with clutter?

Do you have difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, excessive collecting, or clutter in your home? If so, you may be eligible to participate in an anonymous online survey (IRB #6677) to help us better understand what kinds of treatments and services are acceptable to you. The entire study will take you approximately 30 minutes to complete. After completing the survey, you can enter for a chance to win a $100 Amazon.com gift card. Click here to take the survey.

For further information, please call Amanda Levinson at 212-543-5081 or visit our website:
Columbia Psychiatry Hoarding Research Program http://www.columbiapsychiatry.org/hoarding/  


Assisting Older Family Members with Medications — Online Survey

Researchers at the St. Louis College of Pharmacy and the University of Missouri-St. Louis are interested in learning about the experiences of women who assist aging family members and/or friends with their medications. Examples include helping with trips to the doctor, conversations with medical providers regarding prescription drug use, filling/refilling prescriptions, overseeing when medicines are administered, etc. Specifically, we are looking at the collection, organization, and disposal of medications.

We are looking for women who:

  • Are at least 18 years old
  • Provide medication assistance to a family member or friend who is 60+ years of age
  • Are willing to spend approximately 25 minutes filling out questionnaires about their
  • experiences related to medication management online at their convenience

Participants who finish the survey will be mailed a $20 Target gift card in appreciation.

How do I participate?

To access the survey, go to: https://www.research.net/s/UMSLmedsurvey
For questions, email our program staff at caregiverpsychology@umsl.edu
All study procedures have been approved by St. Louis College of Pharmacy and UM-St. Louis’ Institutional Review Boards.


Volunteers wanted to help learn about Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

We are looking for individuals who:

  • Have, or think they may have, BDD or OCD
  • Are at least 18 years old
  • Are willing to tell us about their experiences related to these concerns
  • Are willing to spend approximately 45 minutes filling out questionnaires about their experiences and concerns online, at their convenience

Why would I participate?

To help further our scientific knowledge about BDD and OCD. The information from this study is intended to improve treatments for such problems.

Also, participants are entered into a raffle for compensation (up to 75 participants will receive compensation).

How do I participate?

If you would like further information or are interested in participating, please visit our website at https://gmupsych.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0VbNTiY74GZOnGt.

All study procedures have been approved by George Mason University’s Human Subjects Research Ethics Board.


Neurostimulation and Behavior Therapy for Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder

The Brain Stimulation Lab at the Medical University of South Carolina is recruiting participants for a treatment study for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, or OCD. This study will require participants to complete a comprehensive assessment and 14 weeks of treatment. Treatment will involve behavior therapy and brain stimulation. Enrollment is very limited so all interested persons are encouraged to inquire as soon as possible. For more information about the study, contact Thomas Adams at 843-792-4636.


Individuals with either Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder or Hoarding Disorder Needed for Research Study

PI: Jedidiah Siev, PhD

 

The OCD and Related Disorders Clinic affiliated with Nova Southeastern University (Fort Lauderdale, FL) is seeking volunteers to participate in a brief and simple online survey pertaining to decision-making styles. Participants will have the opportunity to enter their name in a draw for a chance of winning one of two $25 gift cards to P.F. Chang’s, one of two free meal gift cards (approximately a $13 value) to Sweet Tomatoes, or one for four $25 gift cards to Whole Foods supermarkets.

 

To participate in this study, you must:

  • Have a diagnosis of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or Hoarding Disorder
  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Be fluent in English

If you meet these criteria and would like to participate, please access the survey at: http://j.mp/148vUKc  

If you would like more information, please contact us at:
Nova Southeastern University
Center for Psychological Studies

Contact:
Lori Merling - lm1675@nova.edu
Jedidiah Siev, PhD – js3088@nova.edu
Call: 954-262-5809


Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD

Principal Investigator: Katharine Phillips, MD

The Body Dysmorphic Disorder Program
Rhode Island Hospital
Providence, RI

We are conducting a research study to learn more about two different forms of therapy to help individuals with BDD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a promising new treatment for BDD, and supportive psychotherapy (SPT), the most commonly received therapy for BDD. We would like to find out which treatment is more effective for BDD. Participants will be randomly assigned (like the flip of a coin) to receive 22 sessions (over 24 weeks) of either CBT or SPT.

Please contact:
Joseph Donahue
(401) 444-1644
BDD@Lifespan.org  


The Impact of Hoarding Cleanouts

Primary Investigator: Jennifer Sampson, PhD., LMFT is President and Research Director of The Hoarding Project (THP), a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization aimed at providing education, research, and treatment for people who hoard, their families, and communities.

Dr. Sampson is currently conducting a research study titled, "The Lived Experience of People who Hoard who have Undergone a Forced Cleanout of their Home."

Hoarding has long been identified as a community health problem and has been found to have a significant economic and social burden on communities at large. It is clear to experts that forced full- and partial- cleanouts- or abatements- are not helpful without mental health assistance. In fact, these cleanouts may even be harmful to the homeowners who are forced to clear out their homes to avoid serious consequences, like eviction or loss of child custody. To date, there have been no academic studies on the long-term effects of abatements, and we know almost nothing about the financial and emotional costs of these approaches, both to the community and the individuals who hoard and their families. This significantly limits professional and government agencies in their ability to intervene and respond in appropriate, effective, and ethical ways.

THP appreciates your voluntary participation in this study designed to explore the impact of forced cleanouts on a person who hoards. To be eligible for this confidential phone interview study, you must reside in the United States or Canada and be of age 18 or older and have undergone a forced cleanout by some authority (e.g. court-ordered, code enforcement, housing authority/property manger, protective services, etc.) at least 6 months ago. The survey is open to anyone that meets these requirements. There is a $40 compensation (e.g. Amazon gift card) for interview completion. If you are interested in participating this study or getting more information, please contact research@thehoardingproject.org.


Shame and Self-Consciousness Study

The Bio-Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY is conducting a study looking at the role of shame, self-consciousness, and disgust in individuals with OCD, BDD, and non-clinical controls. The study involves answering a few short online measures that will take between 20 minutes to a half hour to complete. The study is completely confidential. To begin, simply click on the following link https:// www.surveymonkey.com/s/5DNXWWR. Thank you for your time.


Do you have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

UCLA RESEARCH STUDY

Cognitive‐Behavioral Therapy for OBSESSIVE‐COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD)

  • Have thoughts or fears that don't make sense but still make you feel bad?
  • Have to check or do things over and over again?
  • Wash excessively or avoid touching things for fear of contamination?

We are looking for people with OCD to participate in a study providing these benefits:

  • Free Diagnostic Evaluation
  • 4 WEEKS FREE INTENSIVE COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
  • Free Magnetic Resonance Brain Imaging
  • Free Neurocognitive Testing

You may be eligible if you:

  • Are 18-65 years of age
  • Are in good physical health
  • Have no history of certain other psychiatric illnesses

Study conducted by Joseph O’Neill, PhD, Jamie Feusner, MD, and Susanna Chang, PhD.

UCLA OCD Research Program, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behaviors at UCLA

For more information contact:
(310) 206-0468
csheen@mednet.ucla.edu  


PANDAS-PANS-PITAND Online Retrospective Research Study Invitation

Parents of children with PANS-PANDAS and adults with PANS-PANDAS, you are invited to participate in an online survey research study from the University at Buffalo in collaboration with Dr. Tanya Murphy from the University of South Florida to help learn more about the symptoms, diagnosis, interventions, and clinical course of children with PANS including PANDAS and PITAND. Participants in this study can elect to remain anonymous or they can elect to have their name and /or their child’s information entered into a registry for future research. You can access information about the study to decide if you want to be involved by going to http://tinyurl.com/panssurvey.


OCD-TRAC Research Program: The Next Step Towards Improving Treatment Outcomes for Pediatric OCD

Has your child or adolescent been diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)? The Division of Medical Psychology is a leading treatment center for pediatric OCD and one of only three sites approved as a training center for OCD treatment. We offer weekly or daily treatment for pediatric OCD and have some of the best response rates in the nation (85% receive 50% reduction in OCD severity), despite generally seeing patients who have failed to respond to treatment at other centers. If your child receives treatment at our clinic they may be eligible to participate in our research program which is investigating innovative methods to improve treatment outcome for pediatric OCD, including cognitive, family, personality, biological and treatment delivery factors.

To be eligible, your child must be under 18 years old and willing to participate in the study. Participation in the study will allow the clinician to do a complimentary diagnostic assessment of the child’s sleeping behaviors and the child will also receive a free follow-up contact 3 months following treatment. Participants will receive financial compensation for their time.

If interested, please call Dr. Joseph McNamara at (352) 392-3611 or email jpm2@ufl.edu.


Parents of Adolescents with OCD – Online Survey

Parents of Adolescents with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - Your help is needed!

Win an iPad Mini!

Researchers at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia Australia, are working to help families who have a child or adolescent with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Recent research suggests that various difficult behaviours can occur alongside adolescent OCD and cause additional distress for both the affected child and their family. Understanding the types of behaviour that can occur and how confident parents feel to cope with and manage them will help researchers to develop programs to better support parents and families who have a child with OCD. To do this, we need your help! Therefore, we’re looking for parents of adolescents aged 11 – 17 years diagnosed with OCD to take part in an online survey. All parents are invited to register their email address to go into a draw to win an iPad Mini in recognition of their time and support.

Can you help?
If you would like to take part, the survey is accessible at the following website address: https://exp.psy.uq.edu.au/parentingteenagersocd/
Or visit our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/Parents.Adolescents.OCD
Alternatively, if you could please forward this on to any parents of adolescents aged 11 – 17 years with OCD within your networks, it would be greatly appreciated.

If you would like more information on this study please contact the project staff (Rosie Whitehead: rosie.whitehead@uqconnect.edu.au or Dr Cynthia Turner: Cynthia.turner@uq.edu.au).


Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD

Principal Investigators: Sabine Wilhelm, PhD (Boston) and Katharine Phillips, MD (Providence)

Boston, MA
Rachel Schwartz
(617) 4MGH-BDD
raschwartz@partners.org  

Providence, RI
Joseph Donahue
(401) 444-1644
BDD@Lifespan.org  

Massachusetts General Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital are conducting a research study to learn more about two different forms of therapy to help individuals with BDD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a promising new treatment for BDD, and supportive psychotherapy (SPT), the most commonly received therapy for BDD. We would like to find out which treatment is more effective for BDD. Participants will be randomly assigned (like the flip of a coin) to receive 22 sessions (over 24 weeks) of either CBT or SPT. Study visits will take place at either Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts or at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island.


Antibiotic Treatment Trial for the PANDAS/PANS Phenotype

Has your child experienced a sudden onset of obsessive compulsive symptoms?

The Rothman Center for Neuropsychiatry is looking for volunteers to participate in a research study on antibiotic treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder due to PANS/PANDAS phenotype. The anxiety is typically severe and is accompanied by deterioration in behavior or previously acquired academic skills. These symptoms may represent PANS, Pediatric Acute Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome, and PANDAS, a specific subset: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcus.

We are looking for children:

  • Ages 4 –14 years.
  • OCD of sudden and severe onset that occurred less than 6 months ago.
  • Who are not currently taking prophylactic antibiotics.

If your child qualifies, he or she will receive neuropsychiatric evaluation and potentially 12 weeks of antibiotic therapy free of charge. Your child will also participate in assessments over the course of the study in which they will be evaluated by a physician and closely monitored.

We are also interested in learning more about how infections and other immune factors may contribute to OCD onset in youth with PANS/PANDAS.If you would like to know more about the study or have any questions, please contact us at (727) 767-8393 and ask to speak to a research coordinator, or by email at RothmanCtr@health.usf.edu.


OCD Study

Do you have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

Are you currently taking medication but are still struggling to stop OCD symptoms?

We are currently seeking volunteers for a 21 week research study using an experimental drug for OCD. The study involved 11 study visits. Participants will be reimbursed for time and travel. You must be 18-65.

If interested, please contact:

Katherine Derbyshire, BS
Psychiatric Research Specialist
University of Chicago, Department of Psychiatry
Addictive, Compulsive, and Impulsive Disorders Research Program
ph: 773-702-9066
kderbyshire@uchicago.edu  

Dr. Jon Grant is directing this study at the University of Chicago.
Jon Grant, MD, JD, MPH
University of Chicago, Department of Psychiatry


Do you have a fear of vomiting?

This fear can be chronic and debilitating, affecting work and academic performance, social functioning, and family life. This fear is known as Emetophobia, and as Specific Phobia of Vomiting. The research study, based at Argosy University San Diego, will measure the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing fear of vomiting. Eligible San Diego and Riverside County, California residents are invited to participate at no cost. The study will take approximately 14 weeks, with weekly visits lasting between one and two hours.

You may be eligible if:

  • You are 18 or older.
  • You have a fear of yourself vomiting both alone and in front of others.
  • You are willing to complete various assessments and tests over the course of the study. This involves answering demographic questions, questions about past or current symptoms that you may be experiencing, and details about your fear of vomiting.
  • You are willing to travel to a clinic to participate in assessments and 12 weekly sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy, or be assigned to a waiting list and be given the option to participate in the therapy sessions after the waiting period.

For more information or to sign up, call:
Lori Riddle-Walker at 760-715-7273
or go to Vphobia.com  


The Sertraline Pediatric RegIstry for The Evaluation of Safety (SPRITES)

Has your child received a new prescription of sertraline or recently started psychotherapy to treat their psychiatric condition?

If you answered YES to this question, your child may be eligible to participate in a long-term research study to learn about how sertraline or psychotherapy affect aspects of the cognitive, emotional, and physical development in children/adolescents ages 6 to 16.

For qualified participants, the SPRITES study will include 8 study visits over the course of 3 years. Each study visit will take approximately 30 minutes to complete, however the first study visit may take longer (e.g., 45 to 60 minutes). Based on their clinical judgment, the study doctor will decide if your child will receive a new sertraline prescription or start psychotherapy to treat their psychiatric condition. This may mean that if your child is currently taking another medication for their psychiatric condition, the study doctor may adjust the medication dose, or discontinue the medication entirely, if necessary, without affecting your child’s participation in the SPRITES study.

During the study period, patients must agree to follow all the study requirements, including keeping all study visit appointments, and following the directions of their study doctor. Patients/ parents will receive compensation for their transportation/ time for SPRITES study visits. The study is also seeking interested study centers to participate in the study. If you are a mental health care provider who treats pediatric patients that are currently treated with or could benefit from treatment with sertraline, contact us for more information.

FOR MORE INFORMATION about the SPRITES study, PLEASE CONTACT:

Jennifer Murphy at Jennifer.murphy@duke.edu or (919) 668-8795.

Or visit the clinicaltrials.gov posting for this study: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01302080 


Online Child OCD Study

Does your child engage in repetitive behaviors they cannot control? Does your child worry excessively about germs, orderliness or health? Help CWRU researchers learn more about children with OCD and their families. If your child is between 4-8 and struggles with OCD please fill out our online questionnaires! We hope to use this study to learn more effective ways to treat OCD. You can participate by going to http://psychology.case.edu/research/fear_lab/participate.html.


Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Research Study

Massachusetts General Hospital is conducting a research study of an investigational medication for adults ages 18-65 with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Eligible participants will receive study related procedures and study medication at no cost. The study involves 9 visits to our clinic and three phone interviews over 21 weeks. Participants will be compensated for each completed study visit and reimbursed for travel expenses.

Participants may be eligible if they are:

  • Diagnosed with OCD
  • 18-65 years old
  • Currently taking an SSRI antidepressant medication
  • In general good health

For more information, please call Liza Rosenfield at 617-643-4387 or e-mail erosenfield@partners.org.


A Study of Sexual Worries and Cognitions

Researchers at the University of Louisville, University of Houston Clear Lake, and Nova Southeastern University are conducting research on Sexual Orientation OCD (SO-OCD / HOCD). They are interested in volunteers who want to participate in the research study. The reason for the study is to create a new tool for therapists and researchers to use so they can easily identify and recognize Sexual Orientation OCD in the people they treat. Other psychological measures will also be given to help understand some of the concerns and traits of individuals with Sexual Orientation OCD problems. The current study will be conducted entirely online and individuals may be eligible to receive compensation of a $15 gift card.

If you are interested, please carefully read the qualifications for study eligibility below:

  1. You must have previously been diagnosed with OCD and be willing to provide documentation that will allow researchers to confirm your OCD diagnosis.
  2. You must be willing to participate in an initial phone screening.
  3. We are interested in individuals who experience a variety of OCD symptoms (contamination concerns, order, symmetry, harming obsessions, checking, and sexual orientation OCD).
  4. You must 18 years or older.
  5. Be willing to complete a battery of questionnaires that will take approximately one hour to complete.

If you meet the criteria above and you are interesting you should contact so-ocd@mentalhealthdisparities.org or phone (502) 852-7413 or complete the online form at http://www.mentalhealthdisparities.org/so-ocd.php. Importantly, your name and interest in the study will be kept confidential during the initial screening process and throughout the study if you decide to participate. We would also be happy to answer any questions you might have about the study or the screening process.

The principal investigator of this study is Monnica Williams, Ph.D. of The University of Louisville. She can be reached at (502) 852-2521.


Video Camera Treatment Study for Anxious Children and Teens

Participation in this study:

  • Is voluntary, private and completely confidential
  • Applies to children and teens, ages 7-17, who are seeking treatment for an Anxiety Disorder
  • Involves NO medication
  • Provides FREE treatment, tailored specifically to your (or your child’s) anxiety diagnosis
  • Can be done in person or online
  • Begins with a simple phone call

What is Anxiety?  

Anxiety can be a normal part of growing up, but one in eight children suffer from an Anxiety Disorder, which may include symptoms such as extreme and persistent fear, excessive worry, perfectionism, unusual and/or repeated unwanted thoughts or habits, difficulty separating from parents, or extreme shyness. Children with anxiety may appear depressed as a result of the inability to control anxiety and situations that provoke anxiety. Also, symptoms of anxiety may cause a person to avoid places and activities.

Research shows that children with Anxiety Disorders who remain untreated are at higher risk to perform poorly in school, miss out on social interaction with peers, and are more likely to drink and/or use drugs.

What is this research study?  

Our team is offering a special type of talk therapy, called Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (or CBT for short), to treat children and teens with Anxiety Disorders. CBT is a widely accepted form of therapy which has been scientifically proven to be effective in the treatment of Anxiety Disorders. CBT teaches targeted skills and techniques to reduce anxiety. Our treatment team is led by Dr. Dean McKay, an expert in the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders with over 20 years of experience.

What will I be asked to do?  

If you and your child agree to participate, the study begins with a 90-minute evaluation interview, during which time you and your child will be asked questions about anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive problems. This first interview can be done from your home using computer video-conferencing. At this time we will also ask you to provide the name of the closest hospital to you. This information is needed only to verify the geographic location of the hospital. In the event of an emergency, it is important that we be able to refer you to immediate care in your area. If you qualify for the study, about one month later, you and your child would receive specialized CBT treatment tailored to your (or your child’s) diagnosis, at no cost. Although each treatment plan is uniquely specialized, it may be helpful to know that treatment can vary from 2 sessions a week for eight weeks, to having 2 sessions a day for one week, depending on your (or your child’s) diagnosis. Once you meet with your individual therapist, you will have a more clear sense of your individual treatment plan. Treatment sessions can be conducted either in person at Fordham University or online using a video camera. The components of treatment are the same whether therapy is done in person or online. Before treatment, after treatment, and again three months later, you and your child will be asked to complete questionnaires.

What can I expect?  

While improvement can never be guaranteed, most children and teenagers who are treated for Anxiety Disorders are able to experience a reduction in symptoms and move on to lead more healthy, fulfilling lives.

This research study is approved by the Fordham University Institutional Review Board.

If you are interested in learning more about this research study, call: (718) 817-0591


Do you worry a lot about someone else's appearance?

Volunteers wanted to help explore excessive appearance concerns about others in a study being conducted by the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

  • Do you have excessive concerns about someone else’s appearance?
  • Are you at least 18 years old?

You may qualify for investigational therapy treatment at no cost as part of a research study.

Call 617-643-6204 to learn more, or visit www.mgh.org/bdd  


Do you have obsessive compulsive disorder?

Have you tried medications but are still having symptoms?

We are currently seeking volunteers for a research study using a novel,investigational drug for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Sponsor provides funding for optional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy after study completion

Must be at least 18 years old

612-626-5167
University of Minnesota
Medical Center, Fairview


Intimacy in the Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum

If you are an adult with OCD, Trichotillomania (i.e., hair pulling), or Compulsive Skin Picking, you are invited to participate in a brief online survey. With the information gathered from this survey, we hope to understand concerns related to intimacy with individuals presenting with these conditions. While there is no direct benefit to participants, the study hopes to better understand intimacy and whether it should be addressed in treatment for OCD, Trichotillomania, and Compulsive Skin Picking. The survey will take approximately 30 minutes to 1 hour to complete. All information provided will be kept completely anonymous.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Chad Wetterneck at wetterneck@uhcl.edu or 281-283-3364.

You can access the survey at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ocspectrumintimacy  


Skin Picking Study

Do you pick your skin? Is it causing problems? Does it feel out of control? We at the University of Chicago are currently seeking volunteers for a drug study using a supplement for skin picking.

Participation in either study requires several visits to our Chicago study center. As a result, those interested in participating must live within the Chicago metro area and must be at least 18 years of age.

If interested in either of these studies, please contact Katherine Derbyshire for more information.

Katherine Derbyshire, BS
Psychiatric Research Specialist
University of Chicago, Department of Psychiatry
Addictive, Compulsive, and Impulsive Disorders Research Program
phone: 773-702-9066
email: kderbyshire@uchicago.edu  


Do you have obsessive-compulsive disorder?

If so, you might be eligible for a research study looking at cognition at The Mount Sinai Medical Center. You must be between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good physical health. We will ask you to come in for 2-3 separate appointments for a total time commitment of approximately 2 to 6 hours. You will be reimbursed for your participation at the rate of 25 dollars per hour. You will receive no direct benefit for your participation in this study.

During this experiment you will be asked to complete some computer tasks. You maybe asked to do this while sitting in an office, or while having your brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We may also ask to record some physiological changes in your body while you complete the task.

For more information, call the Mount Sinai Psychiatric Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory at (212) 241-2857 or email us at SinaiBrainLab@mssm.edu. Please do not disclose any personal or sensitive information via email.


Yale OCD Research Clinic- Treatment Trial for Novel OCD Medication

BACKGROUND:

Several recent studies suggest a glutamate imbalance in some OCD patients. Medications that modulate glutamate, directly or indirectly, represent a potential new avenue to treat OCD symptoms. The Yale OCD Research Clinic at the Connecticut Mental Health Center has been a leader in these investigations over the past decade.

The study (HIC#1206010424) will investigate the efficacy of adding bitopertin to a stable dose of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), such as fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or escitalopram (Lexapro). Bitopertin selectively inhibits glycine reuptake, which increases the amount of glycine in the space outside neurons in the brain. A small controlled study of glycine itself showed encouraging results in patients with OCD (Greenberg, et al., 2009). The Yale OCD Research Clinic, in partnership with F. Hoffman- La Roche Ltd., hopes to expand on these early findings through this large scale, multi-site, double-blinded study.

PARTICIPATION:

The Yale OCD Research Clinic is currently recruiting participants (age 18-65 with no currently significant alcohol or substance abuse issues) whose Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder symptoms have not responded well to first-line medications to participate in a clinical trial of a new investigational medication treatment. This new medication, bitopertin, increases the brain’s level of glycine, an amino acid that modulates the activity of the neurotransmitter glutamate. This study is a double-blind, placebo-controlled 16-week trial of bitopertin, added to a participant’s current SSRI medication. (Yale HIC#: 1206010424).

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01674361

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Suzanne Wasylink, RN-BC
Nurse Manager
Yale OCD Research Clinic
Local: (203) 974-7523
Toll-Free: 1-855-OCD-YALE
ocd.yale.edu

Mac Kelly
Research Assistant
Yale OCD Research Clinic
(203) 974-7534

Or visit the participation section of our website:

http://www.ocd.yale.edu/participate/participate.aspx  


Stanford University Study on Adolescent Females and OCD

Stanford University is looking for adolescent females aged 14 to 19 having problems with intrusive thoughts or have a diagnosis of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

We invite you to come participate in a research study designed to investigate how the brain processes rewardand visual images. Participants will come for two or three 1.5 – 3 hour visits and be paid up to $180.00 for their time. Please let us know if you're interested by contacting Talya Feldman (650) 723-7885 or emailing at tfeldman@stanford.edu. Thanks, we look forward to hearing from you!


The Nature of OCD Thoughts

We are trying to better understand the thinking styles and beliefs that people with obsessive and/or compulsive behaviour (OCD) have. For example, some people with OCD are concerned that their obsessive thoughts have a purpose. Others believe that their thoughts will have an effect on their own and others’ lives. So, they worry about how to prevent any harm that they might cause through their thoughts. This study aims to find out how such an intrusive thought becomes an obsession. The online questionnaire will therefore ask questions about related attitudes, beliefs and experiences.We would appreciate your taking the time to complete the following survey. The survey will take approximately 25mins.

Click here for the survey: https://macquariehs.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0MWWqdPWOJo4WEs  


Minocycline augmentation to serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Therapy- New York, NY

This study aims to determine whether adding a medication called minocycline to antidepressant treatment can help reduce symptoms of pediatric OCD. This study also aims to learn more about the brains of children and adolescents with OCD.

Your child must be taking a stable dose of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) in order to participate in this study. During the 12 week study period, your child will continue to take the SRI s/he is currently taking. Your child will also be given another medicine to take which will be either minocycline or pill placebo (a pill with no medicine in it). There is a two out of three chance that your child will receive minocycline instead of placebo. You, your child, and the study doctor will not know whether your child is receiving minocycline or placebo until after the study is over, but the information will be available in case of a medical emergency.

Participants will be compensated for their participation. After the study period, follow-up care including medication management will be provided for three additional months at no cost to you.

Organization: Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute

Principal Investigators: Dr. Moira Rynn, M.D. and Dr. H. Blair Simpson

Eligibility Criteria:  

  •  
  • 8 - 20 years
  • Genders: both
  • Key inclusion criteria: Primary diagnosis of OCD and currently on a stable and adequate dose of an SRI
  • Your child may be eligible to participate in this study if he/she is diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Exclusion Criteria:
Exclusion criteria include, but are not restricted to the following:

  •  
  • Lifetime diagnosis of: psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, eating disorder, pervasive developmental disorder, mental retardation, or substance/alcohol dependence
  • Current diagnosis of major depressive disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Tourette’s/Tic Disorder, or substance/alcohol abuse
  • Diagnosis of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS)
  • Active Suicidal Ideation
  • Hoarding as the primary OCD symptom
  • Pregnant, nursing, or planning to become pregnant

Contact:
For more information pleace contact Study Coordinator Prerna Martin at (646) 774-5793.

Location:
New York, NY


Attaining and Maintaining Wellness in OCD

  • Are you taking one of the following medications for obsessive- compulsive disorder?
    • Clomipramine (Anafranil)
    • Fluoxetine (Prozac)
    • Fluvoxamine (Luvox)
    • Sertraline (Zoloft)
    • Paroxetine (Paxil)
    • Citalopram (Celexa)
    • Escitalopram (Lexapro)
  • Are you still having bothersome symptoms?
  • Are you interested in receiving no-cost psychotherapy that can improve your OCD symptoms?
  • Are you interested in learning if you still need medication after significant improvement with EX/RP therapy?

If you answered “yes” to all four questions, you may be eligible for treatment as part of a research program at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.
The Center for OCD and Related Disorders at the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University and the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania are offering treatment as part of a research study for people who have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and are currently taking one of the above medications for their OCD but still have unwanted symptoms.

Eligible participants initially remain on a stable dose of their OCD medication and will receive cognitive behavioral therapy consisting of Exposure and Ritual Prevention (EX/RP) twice a week for up to 12 weeks as additional treatment. Participants who become well (with only minimal to mild OCD symptoms) after the EX/RP will be randomly assigned (assigned by chance) to either continue their medication or begin to taper off their medication and have it gradually replaced with a placebo (sugar pill). All patients will be carefully monitored throughout the study for 24 weeks. The goal of the study is to understand whether patients with OCD on Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SRIs) who achieve wellness from EX/RP can safely discontinue their medication.
No one who has not become well after 12 weeks of EX/RP will discontinue their medication. Individuals who do not improve significantly will be referred elsewhere to receive appropriate clinical treatment.

This study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, is a collaboration between Dr. Blair Simpson from Columbia University-New York State Psychiatric Institute and Dr. Edna Foa from the University of Pennsylvania. Men and women ages 18-75 with OCD who are currently taking an SRI medication (Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Luvox, Celexa, Lexapro or Anafranil) and who are not taking other psychotropic medications at the same time may be eligible to participate in this study. There is no cost for the cognitive-behavioral therapy.

For more information about the study visit our website at www.ocdtreatmentstudy.com. To talk to someone about participation at the New York site, please contact Dr. Marcia Kimeldorf at the Center for OCD and Related Disorders at the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University in New York at (646) 774-8049. For information about participation at the Philadelphia site, please contact the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania at (215) 746-3338.


Neuropsychology Comparison Group for OCD Study

Principal Investigator: Benjamin Greenberg MD, PhD
Butler Hospital
365 Blackstone Blvd.
Providence, RI 02906

Butler Hospital is conducting a separate nonsurgical study examining the relationship between the brain and behavior in OCD. This study consists of a clinical interview and testing on two occasions within a year. Participants in this study will be compensated for their time.

For more information, contact rmcmahon@butler.org or call (401) 455-6594.


DBS for OCD: Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Principal Investigator: Benjamin Greenberg MD, PhD
Butler Hospital
365 Blackstone Blvd.
Providence, RI 02906

Have you been diagnosed with severe OCD? If yes, and you are between the ages of 18 and 75,you may be eligible to participate in a neurosurgical treatment for OCD. Deep Brain Stimulation for OCD is an NIMH sponsored clinical study. Nine sites throughout the US are involved in this study.

For more information, contact rmcmahon@butler.org or call (401) 455-6594.


Mt. Sinai OCD Research Study

Are you bothered by recurrent and disturbing thoughts (obsessions) or irresistible urges to check or repeat things (compulsions)?

Examples of obsessions are concerns with contamination, intrusive images or fear of terrible things happening.

Examples of compulsions are checking for safety, excessive washing, or time-consuming rituals.

The Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry is recruiting participants for anew investigational medication research study. The study Is for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder(OCD) and eligible participants will receive study related procedures and study medication at no charge.

To qualify for the study, you must:

  • Be between the ages of 18 and 65
  • Currently be taking medication for OCD
  • Continue to have symptoms of OCD while on medication

For more information, please contact:
Resham Gellatly at (212) 659-1677

Mount Sinai School of Medicine – 1240 Park Avenue – New York, NY 10029 – 212-659-1600


Biomarkers of OCD Subtypes using Brain Imaging

Principal Investigator: Christopher Pittenger, M.D., Ph.D.
Yale OCD Research Clinic
New Haven, CT

BACKGROUND:

A number of studies using different techniques have suggested that the neurotransmitter glutamate is present at excessive levels in at least some patients with OCD. This idea has motivated our use of glutamate-modulating drugs in OCD that has not responded to standard therapies. However, the details of how glutamate is out of balance in OCD remain unclear. Likewise, it is unclear whether glutamate dysregulation contributes to all forms of OCD or only to some subtypes. Better understanding this issue may, in the future, help us select which therapies are most likely to work for individual patients.

The Yale OCD Research Clinic uses an imaging method, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), to measure the levels of glutamate and related molecules in the brain. This is done in a brain scanner very similar to that used for the MRI imaging that is standard in all hospitals. By better understanding how and where glutamate is disrupted in OCD, we hope to expand our knowledge of the biological changes that contribute to the disorder and how to develop new medication strategies to address them.

PARTICIPATION:

This study involves answering questions about your psychiatric condition and then having a single MRS scan. An MRS scan is very similar to an MRI scan, which is done routinely in clinical care; it requires you to lie still in a large scanner for about 90 minutes. Both OCD patients who are on no medications and those who are on medications and are entering one of our treatment studies are eligible for this study. (Yale HIC #: 0803003626)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Suzanne Wasylink, RN-BC
Nurse Manager
Yale OCD Research Clinic
Local: (203) 974-7523
Toll-Free: 1-855-OCD-YALE
 

Mac Kelly
Research Assistant
Yale OCD Research Clinic
(203) 974-7534
Or visit the participation section of our website:

http://www.ocd.yale.edu/participate/participate.aspx  


Riluzole Medication Study for Treatment-Refractory OCD

Principal Investigator: Christopher Pittenger, M.D.
Yale OCD Research Clinic
New Haven, CT

BACKGROUND:

Several lines of evidence suggest that the neurotransmitter glutamate is out of balance in at least some cases of OCD. Medications that modulate glutamate in the brain may therefore represent a new avenue to treat OCD symptoms, and may be of use in patients whose symptoms do not respond well to established methods of treatment. Some years ago, the Yale OCD Research Clinic began investigating the glutamate-modulating drug riluzole (Rilutek®), which is FDA-approved for the treatment of the neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In early studies, without a control group, we found this medication to be helpful to a number of patients with severe, treatment-refractory OCD. In a follow-up study with another group of patients – still without a control group – we found that this benefit can persist for over a year after initial treatment. Another group of investigators, working at the National Institute of Health, has recently published preliminary evidence that riluzole may be of benefit in pediatric OCD.If this is to be established as a viable treatment for refractory OCD, benefit to patients must be shown in a placebo-controlled study. We have recently begun such a study, and are seeking patients to participate in it. With this placebo-controlled study, we hope to confirm our promising but preliminary early results and better establish whether or not riluzole has a role in the treatment of OCD after first-line medication has been tried.

PARTICIPATION:

We are currently recruiting people (age 18 to 65) who have been diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder to participate. This study is a double-blind, placebo-controlled 14-week trial of riluzole, added to participant’s current medication. (Yale HIC #: 0509000614)
Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00523718
 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:
Suzanne Wasylink, RN-BC
Nurse Manager
Yale OCD Research Clinic
Local: (203) 974-7523
Toll-Free: 1-855-OCD-YALE
ocd.yale.edu

Mac Kelly
Research Assistant
Yale OCD Research Clinic
(203) 974-7534
Or visit the participation section of our website:

http://www.ocd.yale.edu/participate/participate.aspx  


Brain Imaging Study for OCD using Positron Emission Tomography

Principal Investigator: Christopher Pittenger, M.D., Ph.D.
Yale OCD Research Clinic
New Haven, CT

BACKGROUND:

Antidepressant medications that target the serotonin system of the brain have long been used in the treatment of OCD and are of significant benefit to approximately 50% of patients. However, whether abnormalities of the serotonin system are a cause of OCD, and how they may contribute, remains quite unclear. Several lines of evidence, from pharmacological studies in patients and from work in mice, suggest that a particular serotonin receptor, the 5HT-1b receptor, may contribute to OCD symptoms.The Yale OCD Research Clinic is investigating this hypothesis using positron emission tomography (PET), a brain imaging technique that allows visualization of particular neurotransmitter receptors in the brain using very low doses of a radioactive tracer and a special camera. We are examining the receptors both in patients with OCD (on no medications) and in control subjects without OCD, and comparing the two. Subjects who do this imaging study may also perform tests of sensory gating, to test the association between sensory gating and this serotonin receptor.

PARTICIPATION:

This study involves several visits to our clinic. First, subjects will participate in standard screening and clinical and medical assessments, as in most of our studies. They will then have a standard MRI brain scan, which gives a 3-dimensional picture of the brain. The third session is the PET imaging. This is along session (several hours) that begins quite early in the morning. Finally, subjects may be brought back for a test of sensory gating. Because participation in this study requires multiple visits, some of which are fairly long, the compensation for participants' time is higher than for our other studies. (Yale HIC #:0612002100)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Suzanne Wasylink. RN-BC
Nurse Manager
Yale OCD Research Clinic
Local: (203) 974-7523

Toll-Free: 1-855-OCD-YALEocd.yale.edu

Mac Kelly
Research Assistant
Yale OCD Research Clinic
(203) 974-7534

Or visit the participation section of our website:

http://www.ocd.yale.edu/participate/participate.aspx  


Are you diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive disorder?

Are you receiving therapy and/or medication for OCD but are still having a hard time managing your symptoms? Free help may be available to you.

The OCD Researchers and clinicians at Butler Hospital and the Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island are looking at two different health interventions that may help improve OCD symptoms.

Participation in this study will include:

  • An initial interview and computer-based tasks
  • Meeting with the study physician and an assessment of physical fitness
  • Random assignment (by chance) to one of two programs:
    • A 12-week moderate intensity aerobic exercise program supervised by an Exercise Physiologist
    • A 12-week health and wellness education program led by an OCD expert
     

This study is open to adults between the ages of 18-65. Eligible participants are reimbursed up to $445 for their time and effort.

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about the study please contact:

Julie Desaulniers, MS
Project Coordinator
(401) 455-6219 or jdesaulniers@butler.org  


Do you suffer from OCD?

Do you:

  • Worry a lot about germs or contracting a serious disease?
  • Have a strong need for symmetry or exactness?
  • Constantly doubt the accuracy of things you do?
  • Describe yourself as a superstitious person?

Are you spending large amounts of time:

  • Cleaning/Washing your home or workplace?
  • Doing things several times or until it feels right?
  • Counting objects like stairs, floor or ceiling tiles?
  • Repeatedly checking locks, light switches and appliances?
  • Arranging/Organizing?

You may be eligible to participate in a research medication study in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. You must be between the ages 18-65.

For more information contact:
Jasmine at 905-921-7644, or email us at jasmine@macanxiety.com
www.macanxiety.com  


Are you concerned about your appearance?

Are you between the ages of 18 and 30?

  • Are you concerned about specific features of your appearance that you believe are ugly or unattractive?
  • Are you spending much of your day thinking about your appearance?
  • Are you avoiding mirrors or spending a lot of time looking in the mirror?
  • Is your concern causing a lot of distress and/or interfering with your functioning?

If so, you may have a psychiatric condition called Body dysmorphic disorder, and may be eligible to take Part in a study that is providing free:

  • Diagnostic Evaluation
  • Brain scans: functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)
  • EEG

In addition, you will be paid for your participation.

Study conducted by Jamie Feusner, M.D.
and Michael Strober, Ph.D.

For more information call:

(310) 206-0468
csheen@mednet.ucla.edu  

http://www.semel.ucla.edu/bdd/research  


N-acetylcysteine for the Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

The Yale Child Study Center is conducting a study on N-acetylcysteine (a natural supplement)in children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Subjects will receive either active N-acetylcysteine or a placebo for 12 weeks and remain on current medications.

The study is open to children ages 8 to 17 with chronic Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Participants will be compensated up to $150 for their participation.

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about the study please contact Jilian Mulqueen at (203)-737-4809 or jilian.mulqueen@yale.edu  

HIC#1004006623


Group Therapy Imagining Study for Pediatric OCD

Do you have a child with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?Children with OCD (ages 8-20) and their parents are needed for a research study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to understand how cognitive behavior therapy helps patients get better.

Youth with OCD are provided with cognitive behavioral group therapy, delivered by an expert clinician at the University of Michigan over about 12 weeks. Volunteers must be able to come for a 1-5 hour interview (interview may occur over one or two sessions) and a 1 hour fMRI scan with a parent, for a total of 2-5 hours, before and after treatment. Payment is $50.00 for each interview and $50.00 for each scan. Subjects will also be reimbursed for mileage if they live further than 20 miles from the Rachel Upjohn Building.

Contact us at 734-232-0443 or ocdkids05@umich.edu for more information.

Your child may have OCD if he/she experiences:

  1. Persistent, disturbing worries, doubts, or fears
  2. Repetitive urges to wash, organize, check or pray
  3. Uncontrollable, upsetting, or inappropriate thoughts or mental images
  4. Habits or patterns of behavior that interfere with daily life
  5. A tendency to ask repeatedly for reassurance
  6. A need to do things “just right”
  7. Urges to hoard useless objects

 


OCD Treatment Study for 4-8 year olds with OCD

The Boston University Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders is recruiting participants for a research project evaluating a family-based treatment for obsessive-compulsive symptoms in young children.

You and your child may be eligible to participate in this project, which offers a clinical assessment and a 12-week treatment program at no cost to you. You may also be compensated up to $90 for your time completing study assessments.

For more information, please call (617) 353-9610.


Study on Child Anxiety and Family Functioning

The Child Anxiety Research (CARe) Program at Kent State University is interested in learning more about child anxiety and its relationship to family functioning. We are seeking to recruit parents with a child under the age of 18 and who lives at home. In addition, we are interested in recruiting the oldest child of these parents, as long he or she is between 8 and 17 years of age. Participants will be asked to complete an internet-based survey. The survey will take parents no more than 45 minutes to complete. It will take about the same amount of time for the child to complete his or her portion of the survey as well. Parents are free to participate even if their kids don’t want to fill out the survey and even if they don’t feel that their child is very anxious. If you are interested in learning more about this study, please click on the link below.

http://kentstate.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cGVET0J3z3CtFRy

This study has been approved by the Kent State University Institutional Review Board.


Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD

Principal Investigators: Sabine Wilhelm, PhD (Boston) and Katharine Phillips, MD (Providence)

Boston, MA
Anne Wilson
(617) 4MGH-BDD
awilson15@partners.org  

Providence, RI
Martha Niemiec
(401) 444-1644
mniemiec@Lifespan.org  

Massachusetts General Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital are conducting a research study to learn more about two different forms of therapy to help individuals with BDD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a promising new treatment for BDD, and supportive psychotherapy (SPT), the most commonly received therapy for BDD. We would like to find out which treatment is more effective for BDD. Participants will be randomly assigned (like the flip of a coin) to receive 22 sessions (over 24 weeks) of either CBT or SPT. Study visits will take place at either Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts or at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island.


Hoarding/Clutter Online Study

You are invited to participate in a research study about hoarding, conducted by Brianna D. Mann, M.A., a graduate student, and Brian Vandenberg, Ph.D., a faculty member in the Department of Psychology at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Your answers will be completely confidential. The study will take between 30-60 minutes and will involve completing a series of short questionnaires and computer tasks assessing your demographic information, experiences with hoarding, creativity, and decision making. If you choose to participate, you will be entered into a raffle for an iPad.

You are eligible if you

  1. Are 18 or older, AND
  2. Can read and write in English, AND
  3. Think (or know) you might be a “hoarder”, “pack rat”, “clutter bug”, or “clutterer”

 

You are NOT eligible if you:

  1. Think (or know) you might have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  2. Hear voices or have ever been diagnosed with a psychotic disorder (e.g., schizophrenia).
  3. Have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  4. Have dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

 

If you would like to participate and are eligible, please send an email to brim2003@gmail.com, with the word, hoarding, in the subject line. You will receive an automated response with further instructions. Please note that there will be no way for the researcher to connect your email address or name to your responses on this survey.


Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Needed for Research Study

Nova Southeastern University is seeking volunteers to participate in a brief, one- visit research study involving completion of an interview, questionnaires, and computerized tasks.

To participate in this study, you must:

  • Have religious or moral OCD symptoms
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Be in good general health
  • Be fluent in English

 

Participants may receive up to $75 for their time.

 

If you meet these criteria and would like more information, please call Joseph Slimowicz at (954) 262-5809 or e-mail him at js2869@nova.edu


Study of Website to Improve Communications Between OCD Patients and Family

Are you either an OCD sufferer, or have an OCD sufferer in your family?

If so, and you are 18 years of age or older, and have access to the internet, you are eligible to participate in an anonymous research study.

The study will require you to spend about 20 minutes interacting with a new website providing information about how to better understand OCD and how to improve family communication about OCD. No information will be recorded that would permit you to be identified.

To participate in this study, use your computer’s browser to go to: www.ocdandfamilies.org  

For any questions about this study or the use of the website, email Dr. Lee Baer at lbaer@partners.org  


A positron emission tomography study of the serotonin 1B receptor in OCD

Antidepressant medications that target the serotonin system of the brain have long been used in the treatment of OCD and are of significant benefit to approximately 50% of patients. However, whether abnormalities of the serotonin system are a cause of OCD, and how they may contribute, remains quite unclear. Several lines of evidence, from pharmacological studies in patients and from work in mice, suggest that a particular serotonin receptor, the 5HT-1b receptor, may contribute to OCD symptoms.

We are investigating this hypothesis using positron emission tomography (PET), a brain imaging technique that allows visualization of particular neurotransmitter receptors in the brain using very low doses of a radioactive tracer and a special camera. We are examining the receptors both in patients with OCD (on no medications) and in control subjects without OCD, and comparing the two. Subjects who do this imaging study may also perform tests of sensory gating, to test the association between sensory gating and this serotonin receptor.

Participation in this study involves several visits to our clinic. First, subjects will participate in standard screening and clinical and medical assessments, as in most of our studies. They will then have a standard MRI brain scan, which gives a 3-dimensional picture of the brain. The third session is the PET imaging. This is a long session (several hours) that begins quite early in the morning. Finally, subjects may be brought back for a test of sensory gating. Because participation in this study requires multiple visits, some of which are fairly long, the compensation for participants' time is higher than for our other studies. Anyone interested in more information should contact our nurse manager, Suzanne Wasylink, at (203) 974-7523.


Cerebral glutamate levels in OCD: Pathophysiology and predictors of response

A number of studies using different techniques have suggested that the neurotransmitter glutamate is present at excessive levels in at least some patients with OCD. This idea has motivated our use of glutamate-modulating drugs in OCD that has not responded to standard therapies. However, the details of how glutamate is out of balance in OCD remain unclear. Likewise, it is unclear whether glutamate dysregulation contributes to all forms of OCD or only to some subtypes. Better understanding this issue may, in the future, help us select which therapies are most likely to work for individual patients.

We use an imaging method, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), that allows us to measure the levels of glutamate and related molecules in the brain. This is done in a brain scanner very similar to that used for the MRI imaging that is standard in all hospitals. By better understanding how and where glutamate is disrupted in OCD, we hope to expand our knowledge of the biological changes that contribute to the disorder and how to develop new medication strategies to address them.

Participation in this study involves answering questions about your psychiatric condition and then having a single MRS scan. An MRS scan is very similar to an MRI scan, which is done routinely in clinical care; it requires you to lie still in a large scanner for about 90 minutes. Some people with claustrophobia find this difficult, as the scanner is rather confined. Both OCD patients who are on no medications and those who are on medications and are entering one of our treatment studies are eligible for this study.

Anyone interested in more information should contact our nurse manager, Suzanne Wasylink, at (203) 974-7523.


Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Needed for Family Assessment Study

Does your child have to do things "just right"? Does he have to keep doing something over and over again? Does she have thoughts that constantly bother her? The Child Anxiety Research (CARe) Program is inviting youths ages 9-17 with OCD and one of their parents to participate in a research study. Those eligible receive a full assessment of symptoms, compensation, and written feedback including potential diagnoses and treatment options and referrals. Please call 330-672-2200 if interested or if you're not sure if your child has OCD.

**Not all families will qualify. Duration of participation for these families will not exceed 2 hours.

 

This posting has been approved by the Kent State University Institutional Review Board.


Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Needed for Treatment Study

Does your child have to do things "just right"? Does he have to keep doing something over and over again? Does she have thoughts that constantly bother her? The Child Anxiety Research (CARe) Program offers assessment and treatment services to children and adolescents ages 4-17 with OCD. Families meeting eligibility requirements may receive a full assessment of symptoms, treatment recommendations, and, if eligible, treatment at the CARe Program. Please call 330-672-2200 if interested or if you're not sure if your child has OCD.

**Not all families will qualify. Duration of participation for these families will not exceed 2 hours.

 

This posting has been approved by the Kent State University Institutional Review Board.


Neurobehavioral Tasks in OCD

Do you have OCD? Are you currently not taking any psychiatric medications?

We are looking for individuals with OCD to participate in a research study comparing patients with OCD to patients with several other disorders to help us understand the differences in the neurocircuitry of the brain across disorders.

This study uses different behavioral tasks and questionnaires to measure participants’ stress reactivity, startle reflexes, and preferences. All information will be kept completely confidential.

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE:

  • You may be eligible to participate if OCD is your primary problem, if you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and are not currently on any psychiatric medications or currently on hormonal birth control, and if you are not pregnant.
  • Subjects must be able to travel to the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University at 1051 Riverside Drive (at 168th Street) in Manhattan

COMPENSATION FOR PARTICIPATION:

Participants will be compensated $200 for completing all study procedures, consisting of approximately 6 hours of testing over 2 consecutive days. Additional payment of up to $85 will also be provided based on performance on one of the tasks.

PROCEDURES:

  1. Screening by phone.
  2. If potentially eligible, a psychiatric evaluation (and urine test) and clinical assessments to confirm eligibility (time estimate of 2 hours).
  3. If eligible, up to 6 hours of testing over 2 consecutive days (4 hours on day 1 and 2 hours on day 2).

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Anxiety Disorders Clinic, Columbia University Medical Center
Julia Goldmark at 646-774-8091 or goldmar@nyspi.columbia.edu  


Hypnosis and OCD

My name is Susan Ricketts and I am studying a Bsc degree in Clinical Hypnotherapy at St Mary’s University London. I am conducting a research project into Hypnosis and OCD. I am interested in finding out what type of information OCD sufferers were offered connected to possible treatment interventions for OCD, the type of treatment received/receiving and its effectiveness. I would also like to find out about attitudes towards hypnosis as a treatment intervention before and after reading an information leaflet about hypnosis (provided in the questionnaire) and how likely an OCD sufferer would be to consider hypnosis as a treatment intervention if referred by their Doctor.

If you have suffered/still suffering with OCD, have received 2 or more treatment sessions (any type of treatment) for OCD and are over 18, please click the link to complete the questionnaire: http://www.survey.smuc.ac.uk/ocd. It will only take a few minutes. Thank you.

Closing date: 6th April 2012.


Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

Principal Investigator- Dr. Antonio Mantovani

 

Overview

This study is a research clinical trial of a non-invasive investigational treatment, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), for people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) that do not respond to medications or cannot tolerate medications side effects.

 

TMS applies a magnetic field to the brain by placing a magnetic coil on the scalp. Each TMS session is 30 minute-long and is delivered every weekday for a series of weeks.

TMS has been approved by FDA for the treatment of depression. In this NIH sponsored clinical trial we are testing whether TMS can treat OCD as well.

 

Participants will be randomly assigned to receive either active TMS or sham (placebo) TMS for 4 weeks. If patients do not improve after 4 weeks, they have the option of receiving active TMS for 4 more weeks. All evaluations and treatment are provided at no cost to the research participant.

 

ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00106249

 

Key Eligibility Criteria:

18-70 years; both genders
Key Inclusion Criteria
OCD is the primary problem

Key Exclusion Criteria:

Metal in the head
History of seizure or stroke
Pregnancy/breastfeeding

Location: Columbia University Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York

For more information, please contact:
Anouk Allart (study coordinator)
Tel: 212-543-5615
E-mail: aa2274@columbia.edu

Dr. Antonio Mantovani (principal investigator)
Tel: 212-543-6081
E-mail: am2518@columbia.edu  


 

Submissions Needed for Academic Book

Submissions of short stories, short creative non-fiction, and art pieces are requested for possible appearance in an academic/scholarly book tentatively entitled “A Lesson in Doubt: the social and linguistic construction of OCD.” Work of up to five double-spaced pages will be considered. Pieces can be written/created on any aspect of OCD, from a number of perspectives including but not limited to first person accounts/takes from sufferers, family members, doctors or community members, etc. Submissions will be accepted until April 15th, 2012. They will be assessed on their literary/artistic merit and appropriateness given the aims of the book (to raise awareness of the social dimensions of OCD beyond medical diagnosis). Please paste your written submission to the body of an email message and send it to patricia.friedrich@asu.edu. For art, please contact me first. If your piece is selected, you will have the option of publishing it under your name, a pseudonym, or anonymously. You must be at least 18 years old to send your work. By submitting your text/art, you are acknowledging that it is your original work and that you grant permission for publication/reproduction in the book. Should your work be accepted for publication elsewhere during the process of review, you agree to withdraw your submission.

This project has been approved by the IRB office at Arizona State University.


UCLA RESEARCH STUDY Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

This study is investigating what, if any, changes in brain chemistry take place in adults with OCD as a result of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). We will measure amounts and distribution of glutamate in the brain using MRSI (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging) scans before and after 4 weeks of CBT.

The study offers:

  • Diagnostic evaluation
  • 4 weeks of FREE intensive CBT (exposure and response prevention): 90 minutes/day, 5 days per week
  • MRI/MRSI brain scans
  • Neurocognitive testing

General inclusion/exclusion criteria for our study:

  • Have no history of bipolar disorder, a psychotic disorder, or substance dependence
  • Are in good physical health
  • Have not already had more than 30 hrs of CBT for OCD
  • Are right-handed
  • Between the ages of 18 and 65
  • Either not taking psychiatric medications or on a stable dose of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (only) for at least 12 weeks

Study conducted by Jamie Feusner, M.D. and Joseph O'Neill, Ph.D.

For more information about the MRI/CBT study call (310) 206-0468


Treatment of Late Life Compulsive Hoarding

This study will examine a new behavioral treatment for older adults with compulsive hoarding.

What is involved?
Participants will be randomized to a new behavioral treatment for compulsive hoarding or case management. There are no fees or costs associated with participation. This is a non-medication study.

Who is eligible?
To participate, you must be over the age of 60 and live in San Diego, California.

Who do I contact?
Please call Catherine Ayers, Ph.D., ABPP at 858-552-8585 extension 2976 for more information.

VA Career Development Award: Treatment of Late Life Compulsive Hoarding (Ayers PI; CSRD-068-10S)


Take Part In A Psychology Research Study

  • Do you dislike the way any part(s) of your body look?
  • you try to hide, change, or check your appearance?
  • you feel the need to do certain things "just right?" Does this interfere with work, school, family, or friends?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might have Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

This study might be a good opportunity for you to learn more about your symptoms.

If you answered no to all these questions, you can still help us learn more about these disorders

Visit www.bddocdstudy.com for more information and how to participate.

Participants will be entered in a raffle to win a $50 Amazon.com gift certificate.


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Supportive Psychotherapy for BDD

PI: Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D.

The purpose of this research study is to learn more about two different forms of therapy to help individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD): cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a promising new treatment for BDD, and supportive psychotherapy (SPT), the most commonly received therapy for BDD. The investigators would like to find out which treatment is more effective for BDD. Participants will be randomly assigned (like the flip of a coin) to receive 22 sessions (over 24 weeks) of either CBT or SPT.

Inquiries: 1-877-4MGH-BDD; bdd@partners.org  


Reactions to Hoarding

Principal Investigators: Martin M. Antony, PhD, CPsych, & Valerie Vorstenbosch, MA
Email: hoardingstudy@psych.ryerson.ca  

 

Do you or a loved one have difficulties throwing things away? Researchers in the Department of Psychology at Ryerson University are seeking individuals to participate in a hoarding research project. The purpose of the project is to investigate loved ones’ reactions to hoarding-related behaviors (acquiring, difficulty discarding, clutter).

 

A brief online screening questionnaire (which participants will not receive compensation for) is required to determine eligibility. If you and your loved one are eligible to participate, you will both be asked to complete a series of online questionnaires and a telephone interview. You will be compensated for your participation, if eligible.

 

For more information about the study, please visit www.hoardingstudy.ca. If you are interested in participating in this study, please email Valerie Vorstenbosch at hoardingstudy@psych.ryerson.ca.


OCD and relationships

The goal of this study is to gather information about the relationships of individuals with OCD and those who hoard. To do so, we are asking people who have OCD and who hoard to complete questionnaires about their emotions and relationships. You must be at least 18 years old to participate in this study.This study involves completing a Web-based survey. The survey includes detailed questions about you, your emotions, anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and your relationships. It should take less than one hour to complete.

Some people may find it emotionally uncomfortable to think about their emotions and relationships. However, we would expect that any distress that you experience will last only for the duration of the study.

 

If you choose to participate, your privacy will be protected at all times during the study. You may enter your name and contact information during the completion of the study in order to enter a raffle to win one of two $100 Target Giftcards, which will be awarded at the completion of the study. The research team will do everything possible to maintain your privacy and confidentiality. Only study personnel and members of the board that protects the rights of participants will have access to the information that you provide in this survey. Your questionnaire information will be transferred via the internet to the experimenter. All efforts have been made to maintain your privacy during this transfer, however, no guarantees can be made about other people (like hackers) trying to get the data when you send it by the Internet. Also, your contact information will be removed from the data as soon as it is downloaded but will be maintained in a separate list should you win one of the two gift cards.

 

It is important that you complete the survey in a quiet, private place free of distractions and interruptions.

 

The information that you provide could help to understand more about the relationships of individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder. This information could improve therapies for people with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

If you have problems accessing the study, please send an e-mail reply to axp335@case.edu.

 

The study can be accessed from the following address: http://filer.case.edu/~axp335/ocd.htm  


Romantic Partners’ and Adult Children’s Views: OCD and Relationships

The goal of this study is to gain information about the relationships of individuals with OCD and those who hoard from the perspective of romantic relationship partners and adult children. To do so, we are asking romantic partners and adult children of individuals with OCD and/or hoarding to fill out on surveys including questions about what it is like to be in a relationship with an individual who has OCD and/or hoards. The survey also includes questions about the individual with OCD’s anxiety symptoms and questions about your own emotions, anxiety, and depression. You must be at least 18 years old to participate in this study.

 

At the end of the survey you will have the option to enter your name and contact information during the completion of the study in order to enter a raffle to win one of two $50 Target Giftcards, which will be awarded at the completion of the study. Your name and contact information will not be provided to anyone and will be kept entirely confidential.

 

It is important that you complete the survey in a quiet, private place free of distractions and interruptions.

The information that you provide could help to understand more about the relationships of individuals with OCD and those who hoard. This could help to improve therapies for hoarding and OCD.

 

If you have problems accessing the study, please send an e-mail reply to axp335@case.edu.

 

The study can be accessed from the following address: http://filer.case.edu/~axp335/famocd.htm  


Study of Web-based Treatment for OCD

Do you have obsessive-compulsive disorder or think you might? Have you had trouble finding treatment for your OCD? Do you use the Internet? If you answered “yes” to these questions, you might be eligible to participate in a research study conducted by Dr. Kenneth Kobak of the Center for Psychological Consultation.

This study will evaluate a new, web-based treatment program for obsessive-compulsive disorder called BT Steps. BT Steps teaches participants skills from cognitive behavior therapy and is based on an earlier, telephone-based program that was shown to be effective in a research trial. In the current research study, we will assess the effectiveness of BT Steps alone, or supported by coaching from either a trained coach or a cognitive behavior therapist. This study is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.

 

To participate in this study, you must be at least 18 years old, have OCD, and use or be willing to use the Internet. Participants will be compensated up to $150 for their participation.

 

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about this study please contact Revere Greist at (608) 556-0766 or rgreist@centerforpsychconsulting.com.


Yale Child Study Center Seeks Research Participants

Parents of children aged 7-17 who have OCD are invited to participate in a study designed to look at the impact of a child’s OCD on the functioning of the parents and the family.You (parents only- not child) will be asked to complete some questionnaires about yourself and your child and a clinician will ask you some questions about you and your family.

We offer:

  •  
  • Free parking
  • 50$ compensation

For more information or to enroll please:
Call 203-785-7905 and leave a message

Or Email holly.hermes@yale.edu
IRB#: 1101007868A002


An Open Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Body Dysmorphic Disorder

(PI: Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D.)
Lillian Reuman
(617) 643-6204
www.mghocd.org/bdd
LREUMAN@PARTNERS.ORG  

The purpose of this study is to develop and test the effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for children and adolescents suffering from Body Dysmorphic Disorder. CBT is the most effective psychological treatment for adults with BDD. Information we have so far suggests that CBT might prove effective in treating children and adolescents with BDD as well.


Duloxetine for the Treatment of OCD

(PI: Darin Dougherty, M.D.)
Tina Chou
(617) 643-4742
www.mghocd.org
TCHOU@PARTNERS.ORG  

This study is for people with OCD who are not currently taking any other psychiatric medications (other meds, including birth control, are fine). The study runs for 17 weeks, and involves 6 visits to our clinic in Charlestown. During the first visit subjects are interviewed about their past psychiatric history, and complete a variety of questionnaires. The first study visit is the longest (1-2 hours), but visits after that take 20-30 minutes each. At these visits, subjects fill out some short symptom assessments, and discuss how treatment is going for them. At the final visit we will assess the patients' progress and discuss future treatment options. There is no compensation for the study, but the medication is provided free of charge. Patients who wish to enroll must not be on any psychiatric medications, nor can they be undergoing current behavior therapy. Patients with comorbid bipolar disorder or psychosis are excluded, as are patients who have had a depressive episode in the last 12 months.


Enhancing the Effectiveness of Behavior Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Behavior Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

PI: Sabine, Wilhelm, Ph.D.

1-877-4MGH-BDD
bdd@partners.org

In this study we seek to investigate the effectiveness of D-cycloserine as a memory enhancer for Exposure and Response Prevention in the treatment of Body Dysmorphic Disorder. D-cycloserine is an antibiotic that has been used in the treatment of tuberculosis for over 20 years. Research so far demonstrates D-cycloserine does increase the effectiveness of Exposure and Response Prevention in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. We would like to expand this research with D-cycloserine to see if it is effective with body dysmorphic disorder.


Anonymous Online Survey on Body Movements in Adults with and without OCD

If you are an adult with or without OCD, you are invited to participate in a brief online survey. With the information gathered from this survey, we hope to estimate the prevalence of and begin to understand the function of subtle movements among individuals with OCD. The survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete. While there are no direct benefits for completing the survey, $1 will be donated to the International OCD Foundation for each participant. All information provided will be kept completely anonymous. If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Marilyn Cugnetto at the NeuroBehavioral Institute at 954-217-1757.You can access the survey at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/nbi1  


Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections (PANDAS) Research Study for Children

Children who suddenly developed repetitive behaviors or obsessive thoughts after a strep infection may be able to take part in a research study at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Bethesda, Maryland. We are seeking children with PANDAS between the ages of 4-12 to participate in an inpatient study of whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) improves symptoms for children with PANDAS.

In the first 5-day inpatient stay, some children will receive IVIG and some will receive placebo. This will be decided randomly (like the flip of a coin).After 6 weeks, children with severe persistent symptoms may receive IVIG during another inpatient visit. Two additional one- or two-day outpatient visits are required. There is no cost to participate, and travel and lodging assistance will be provided. Parental consent is required.

For further information please call Rachel Kuschner at Yale (203-737-5588)or Lorraine Lougee at NIH (301-435-6652), or call TTY# 1-866-411-1010,or email Rachel.kuschner@yale.edu or lougeel@mail.nih.gov. National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services.


Does your child have OCD? Are you currently seeking treatment for your child?

D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric OCD

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts are currently investigating how well a medication called D-Cycloserine (DCS) works to help children with OCD respond better to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT is a form of psychotherapy that has already been shown to help kids with OCD.

All children in the study will receive ten sessions of CBT. There is a 50% chance your child will receive the study medication, and a 50% chance that your child will receive a placebo pill (looks like study drug, but contains no active medication). The study also involves visits to the clinic where you and your child will participate in study assessments. These assessments will involve answering questions about your child’s OCD and other psychological symptoms. In addition, we will draw a small amount of your child’s blood toward the beginning and end of the study to make sure she or he is healthy.

To be in the study, your child must:

  • Be diagnosed with OCD by the doctors in our clinic
  • Be between the ages of 7 and 17 years
  • Not have any health problems that could interfere with study participation

There is no cost to participating in this study. We will not charge you for CBT, the study medication, or any of the evaluations.

For more information, please contact the study coordinators at Massachusetts General Hospital at (617) 726-5578 or (617) 726-5527.


Massachusetts General Hospital
Principal Investigator: Dr. Daniel Geller
185 Cambridge St, Suite 2200
Boston, MA 02114


 


Potential Adjunctive Treatment for OCD Patients who do not Adequately Respond to Treatment with a Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

Need more help for your OCD? Many people with OCD experience only a partial response to currently available medications.

Montefiore Medical Center and multiple sites across the U.S. are seeking volunteers to participate in a clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of low-dose ondansetron augmentation for the treatment of OCD in patients who have not adequately responded to their current SRI therapy after at least 12 weeks of stable treatment.

Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to receive ondansetron 0.5 mg, ondansetron 0.75 mg, or placebo, twice daily. Participants will continue the current SRI treatment and receive 12 weeks of augmentation. Participants completing the 12-week treatment may have the opportunity to continue treatment for up to one additional year. Treatment is provided at no cost.

Eligibility criteria: Participants must have a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of OCD as their primary disorder who have been on a stable treatment regimen of clomipramine, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine or sertraline for at least 6 weeks may be eligible for this study. Six additional weeks of stable SRI treatment, without adequate clinical response, will be required prior to randomization, after which the participant will receive SRI plus study drug, for a total of 12 more weeks.

Exclusion Criteria: Exclusion criteria include, but are not restricted to the following:

  • Failure to respond to more than 2 SRI treatments prior to current SRI
  • Hoarding as primary OCD symptom
  • Current or past medical history of schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, schizotypal personality disorder, bipolar disorder, Tourette syndrome, autism or autistic spectrum disorders, eating disorders, PTSD
  • Requiring active behavioral therapy
  • History of drug addiction or drug, alcohol or other substance abuse within the past 12 months
  • Currently taking, or having taken within the previous 8 weeks, any of the following: other SRIs, antipsychotic drugs, lithium, benzodiazepines or other anxiolytics, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, or other anti-depressants (including St. John’s Wort)
  • Likely to use triptans at any time during the study
  • Believed to have suicidal or homicidal risk

Contact: For more information, please contact us at 877-509-6626 or go to www.OCDStudy.info.

 

Locations: Multiple U.S. sites- Southwestern Research, Inc. in Beverly Hills, CA; Sun Valley Research Center in Imperial, CA; Pacific Institute for Medical Research in Los Angeles, CA; Compass Research, LLC in Orlando, FL; Emory University in Atlanta, GA; Carman Research in Smyrna, GA; The Rogers Center for Research and Training in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Global Medical Institutes, LLC, Princeton Medical Institute in Princeton, NJ; Biobehavioral Institute, Hofstra in Great Neck, NY; Columbia University Medical Center, NYS Psychiatric in New York, NY; Richard H. Weisler, MD, PA, and Associates in Raleigh, NC; Quest Therapeutics of Avon Lake in Avon Lake, OH; Community Clinical Research in Austin, TX; Clinical Trials of Texas in San Antonio, TX.

 

Do You Or Your Child Have Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder?

If so...your family may be eligible to participate in a research study examining possible genetic links among individuals with OCD. Dr. Martin Franklin at the University of Pennsylvania's Child and Adolescent OCD, Tics, Trichotillomania and Anxiety Group (COTTAGe) is conducting a research study in conjunction with Johns Hopkins University(JHU) to explore the possible genetic links among families with children or adults with OCD. Participants with a diagnosis of OCD and their two biological parents will be asked to come in to the COTTAGe for one visit that will involve a blood draw from all three family members. This study is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Participants who continue on to complete the other phase of the study with JHU will be compensated by JHU. For more information call Aubrey Edson at (215) 746-3327 or visit our website at www.med.upenn.edu/cottage.


Brain Imaging Research Study (# 6218) Seeks Adolescent Participants with OCD

Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York

Please note that this is an opportunity to participate in research for compensation and not a job posting.

We are looking for adolescents age 12-17 with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) to participate in a research study.

This study is investigating the brain of people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to healthy volunteers for research purposes. The study uses two brain imaging procedures called Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). You will undergo one scan, which lasts for approximately 75 minutes and takes images (pictures) of your brain. There is no radiation exposure risk from the scan. The images are not used for clinical or diagnostic purposes. All information will be kept completely confidential.

BENEFITS AND RISKS OF PARTICIPATING:
Participants are compensated $175 for their time. Please call us to discuss in more detail the benefits and risks of participating.

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE:

  • Participants between the ages of 12 and 17 who have OCD as their primary problem and are not currently on any psychiatric medications, or are on a stable dose of medication, may be eligible.
  • Participants must be able to travel to the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University at 1051 Riverside Drive (at 168 Street) in Manhattan and must not be pregnant.

PROCEDURES:

  1. Screening by phone.
  2. If potentially eligible, a psychiatric and medical evaluation and clinical assessments to confirm eligibility (time estimate of 2-3 hours).
  3. If eligible, a MRI/MRS scan (time estimate of 75 minutes)

This is not a part-time job. Compensation is being provided for participation in a research study.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Children’s Day Unit, Columbia University
(212) 543-0266
 

  • Location: Columbia University Medical Center, NY
  • Compensation: $175 for completion of study and offered two months of free treatment as needed.
  • Phone calls about this are ok.
  • Please do not contact job poster about other services, products, or commercial interests.

Are you a: Packrat? Hoarder? Clutterer?

The UCSD Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (OCD) Program is looking for people with problems with
hoarding, saving or clutter to take part in a study that is providing:

  • Diagnostic Evaluation
  • Brain Imaging Scans
  • 12 weeks free medication treatment
  • Neuropsychological Evaluation

Study Conducted by Sanjaya Saxena, MD
UCSD Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders Program
Department of Psychiatry, UCSD School of Medicine

For more information, please call (858) 334-4640


Healthy females age 35-65

Participants will receive:

  • PET and MRI scans of the brain
  • A Psychiatric Evaluation
  • A Neuropsychological Evaluation
  • Payment for participation

You may be eligible if you:

  • Have no history of psychiatric disorders
  • Are in good physical health
  • Are not taking any medications that affect the brain

For more information please call (858) 534-8056  


UCLA Research Opportunity for Kids and Teens with OCD

We are studying non-drug Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and the brain in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

This UCLA Research Study, conducted by John Piacentini, Ph.D. and Joseph O’Neill, Ph.D., is investigating brain correlates of OCD. We are seeking help from children 8-17 with OCD to participate in this study. Participation involves MRI scans, EEG recordings, and 12 sessions of nonmedication Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Please call (310) 206-1350 for more information.


UCLA Research Study for Adults and Children with OCD

This UCLA Research Study, conducted by James McCracken, M.D., is investigating genetic factors that may increase the risk for OCD. We are seeking help from individuals with OCD (adults and children 8 years-old and up) and their parents to participate in this study. Participation involves an interview and blood draws and you will be compensated $145 for participants’ time.

Please call (310) 206-1350 for more information


UCLA Research Study for Kids & Teens with OCD and Chronic Tic Disorders

We Are Studying Computer Based Attention Training Treatment for Kids with OCD and Chronic Tic Disorders

This UCLA Research Study conducted by Dr. Susanna Chang is investigating the usefulness of a novel computer-based attention training treatment for childhood OCD and tic disorders. We are seeking help from children ages 8 – 17 with OCD or tics as study participants. Participation involves EEG recordings and 5 weeks of a non-medication attention training treatment.

Call (310) 825-0122 for more information.


Drexel University Study – Free Online Treatment for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Do you think you may have obsessive compulsive disorder? Drexel University is conducting a research study that offers a free online treatment program for adults (ages 18-65) suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder. This study compares two versions of exposure and ritual prevention for obsessive compulsive disorders. The treatment consists of 16-18, twice-weekly 90 minute sessions with a therapist using a videoconferencing program called Skype. No medication is involved. All results are confidential. To participate in this study, you must have the ability to speak and read fluent English.

Please visit our website for more information: http://www.drexel.edu/psychology/research/labs/atrp/onlineocd/

 


Neural Correlates of Emotional Response Inhibition in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

The Mount Sinai Center of Excellence for OCD and Related Disorders is recruiting participants 18 years of age or older with a diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder for a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study.

Participation in this study requires one three-hour visit to the Mount Sinai Medical Center for a clinical evaluation and a separate 60-minute MRI scan, which patients will receive at no charge.

Inclusion criteria for the study include:

  • Age 18 years or older
  • Current DSM-IV diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Exclusion criteria for the study include:

  • Severe medical or neurological illness;
  • Presence of any type of metal in the body that cannot be removed (e.g., braces);
  • Claustrophobia or anxiety that precludes being in the scanner for one hour;
  • Visual disturbance of sufficient severity as to impair performance while in the scanner without glasses.

You will receive $170 for your participation in this study.
For further information, please contact Elisabeth Cordell at 212-659-8823 or email centerforOCD@gmail.com  


Genetic Studies of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

The Program for Genetics and Epidemiology of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco is conducting a study to learn more about the relationship between the symptoms of OCD and genetics in people with OCD and their family members.

Participation involves:

  • Filling out questionnaires
  • 2 to 3 hours for a clinical interview
  • Blood draw for genetic analysis
  • Payment up to $30

Inclusion criteria:

  • Having OCD beginning before age 18

Exclusion criteria:

  • Diagnosis of the following: Schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.
  • Presence of Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, or Tourette’s Syndrome

We are also recruiting individuals without OCD and their family members.

If you would like to learn more about this study, please contact Shiva Fekri at 415. 476.7732
We look forward to hearing from you!


Neural Correlates of Compulsive Hoarding

Researchers at The University of California, San Francisco are conducting a study to learn more about people with severe hoarding behaviors and their family members.

Participation involves:

  • 5-10 hours of patient time, over 2 to 3 visits
  • Payment up to $200

Inclusion criteria:

  • 18 years old or older
  • Have severe compulsive hoarding symptoms
  • Have at least one blood degree relative available to participate

Exclusion criteria:

  • Diagnosis of the following: Schizophrenia, Mental Retardation, Known Dementia or any acute condition known to effect executive functioning
  • No living blood relatives

We are also recruiting individuals with non-hoarding OCD and their blood relatives.
If you would like to learn more about this study, please contact Shiva Fekri at 415.476.7732 We look forward to hearing from you!


Neuroimaging of Olfaction in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Do you have contamination-type OCD?

We are investigating the neurocircuitry of basic sensory processing in individuals with contamination-type OCD by examining olfaction during fMRI. Ten people with OCD will be compared to ten matched healthy controls on select measures of emotion, personality and disgust sensitivity, as well as presentation of pleasant and unpleasant smells. Understanding the neural underpinnings of basic sensory deficits in OCD will lead to the development of more effective methods of recognition and treatment for this disorder.

Participants must be between the ages of 18 and 50, right-handed, and in good physical health. Individuals must also have no impairments to their sense of smell, must be able to undergo a one- hour fMRI scan (i.e., no pregnancy or claustrophobia), and have no current or history of neurological illness. Diagnoses of bipolar, psychotic or substance abuse disorders will also exclude individuals from participating. Individuals with OCD must have predominantly contamination concerns and must have a diagnosis of OCD with at least three months of stable symptoms.

You will receive $150 for your participation in this study.

If you are interested, please contact James Fisher at (212) 241-3154 or at james.fisher@mssm.edu.


How much do you care? Self-compassion in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Help us as we examine the relationships between self-compassion and values in OCD.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2ZVJVNC

Help us as we examine the relationships between self-compassion, mood, and response styles in OCD.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PYHKNM2

Click on either link (or enter it into your web browser) to do the survey. If you are over 18 years of age and have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, you may participate.

Participation is completely anonymous. Your information will never be sold or shared and is only for research purposes.


Imaging Genetics Study of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

 

We are conducting a research study to identify biochemical changes and genetic variations associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). By combining brain imaging and genetics, the study will provide new information about the causes of OCD that may lead to improvements in its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. This is a collaborative study being conducted at the University of Michigan, Wayne State University, and Hospital for Sick Children and Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

 

Your child must be between the ages of 6-19 and have a diagnosis of OCD. If he/she is eligible to participate in this study, he/she will participate in an assessment interview, a small saliva collection and/or a small blood draw, and an MRI scan. A parent is required to participate. We are, also seeking healthy controls as research participants. Monetary compensation is provided to those who complete the study.

 

If you are interested or have any questions, please email the project coordinator at ChildAnxiety@umich.edu.

 


Neuroimaging and OCD Study

The University of Kansas Hoglund Brain Imaging Center and the Kansas City Center for Anxiety Treatment are seeking individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder for a study examining brain activation during a cognitive test in OCD

Eligibility: You may be eligible if you are 18-50 years old and have obsessive-compulsive symptoms. What is involved: Completion of questionnaires assessing psychological symptoms such as depression and anxiety, diagnostic interview, cognitive tests, and fMRI scan. Two sessions: 1) initial assessment to determine eligibility and 2) study session, which will include the fMRI scan and additional cognitive tests.

Remuneration of $75 will be offered for completion of the fMRI scan. You may also receive a black and white printed picture of your brain obtained by MRI.

It is important to note that the information gathered in the study is obtained solely for research purposes, and is not meant as a clinical evaluation or treatment for any disorder or symptom.

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about the study please contact: Christy Olson at (913) 649-8820 ext 4 or colson2@kumc.edu  


Hoarding Study in Washington D.C.

Do you COLLECT, CLUTTER and SAVE in excess? Are you unable to use living space for what it is intended, and experience impairment in family relations and social life? The George Washington University School of Education is conducting a study on the nature of compulsive hoarding and understanding how people deal with stressful situations. The study is open to adults aged 18 and over. Participants must live within a 45 minute radius of Northern Virginia.

Participation includes:

  • answer a few screening questions
  • one time meeting of 45 minutes to an hour to complete surveys
  • receive a lottery ticket for participation

For more information, please email Irene Miranda at imiranda@gwmail.gwu.edu or call (571) 276-3859.


Association-Splitting: A web-based study on a novel technique targeting obsessions

Are you suffering from obsessions and would like to try out a new technique against obsessive thoughts? If so, you may have the opportunity to participate in an online study evaluating a new promising technique, which is called “association splitting”. Each participant will receive a pdf-file of the self-help manual free of charge. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique, however, only have of the participants will receive the manual shortly after filling out a survey regarding their symptoms. The other half receives the manual after a period of four weeks right after filling out a second survey. Groups (manual right away or after 4 weeks) are allocated at random.

We would appreciate if you support our study. For further information and study participation, please use the following link: http://www.unipark.de/uc/hh_uni_psych_inst_LJ/3581/

In case of questions please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Lena Jelinek or Prof. Dr. Steffen Moritz via email: neuropsychology@gmx.de.

University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf; Dep. for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy; Hamburg (Germany)


Quality of Life in Adults with OCD

Have you been diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder? Are you between the ages of 18 and 70? If so, we would like to invite you to participate in a survey looking at quality of life in adults with OCD, and the different reasons quality of life might be affected by having OCD. We would love to hear your thoughts about the way OCD has been getting in the way of the life you would like to lead.

The survey can be accessed here: http://hsccm2.hsc.usf.edu/checkbox/Survey.aspx?surveyid=4690

If you have questions, you can contact Jessica Morgan at the University of South Florida at jmorgan1@health.usf.edu or 727-767-8393.


How does the sibling relationship impact Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

The purpose of this study is to examine factors associated with the quality of the sibling relationship and how that relationship impacts a child with OCD. We are hoping to discover how the sibling relationship can benefit a child with OCD. We are examining this relationship – via parent-reports - in up to 150 youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. To participate, your child must be between 6 and 17 years of age and have OCD. In addition, you must be your child’s parent or legal guardian and the child must have interaction with at least one of their siblings.

You will be asked to complete a questionnaire about your children’s behaviors, your child's symptoms related to OCD, and the relationship between that child and the rest of the family, as well as his/her overall quality of life. If you are interested in participating, please follow the link below to begin: http://hsccm2.hsc.usf.edu/checkbox/Survey.aspx?surveyid=4656  


Understanding Obsessive Compulsive Personality Features

Principal Investigator: Anthony Pinto, Ph.D.
NYSPI IRB Protocol #: 5979

Is perfectionism causing problems for you?
Do others complain about your rigidity?
Do you worry too much about order and details?
Do you find it difficult to relax and enjoy free time?
Are you constantly trying to control things?
Do you plan out every minute of your day?

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center/NYSPI in Manhattan are seeking participants (age 18-60) in the NY metro area with several of these features for a study designed to learn more about the obsessive compulsive personality style and ways of thinking, and how these features affect life functioning. Participants will receive a confidential evaluation at no cost and payment upon completion of an interview, questionnaires, and computer tasks.

For more information, contact Ashley Greene at #212-543-5938.


Anxiety Studies Participant Pool

UW Anxiety Studies researchers are currently seeking volunteers for our Anxiety Studies Participant Pool. You may be eligible if you experience any of the following: Recurrent thoughts or images that are unwanted, distasteful, inappropriate, intrusive or distressing, such as:

  • The idea that you were dirty, contaminated or had germs
  • Doubting that you turned appliances off or locked doors properly
  • Fearing that you would act on some impulse
  • Obsessions with sexual thoughts, images, or impulses
  • The need to do something repeatedly without being able to resist doing it, like washing, cleaning, checking or counting
  • The need to do things in a certain way even if another way would be more efficient
  • The need to keep things you don’t need

Diagnosis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Participants who are eligible for the Pool (as determined by a 15-minute confidential phone interview) will be asked to complete:

  • An in-person interview about symptoms of anxiety, depression, drug/alcohol use, unusual experiences and physical sensations (30-60 minutes)
  • Self-report questionnaires about symptoms, mood, social experiences, thoughts about self, concentration and habits (45-60 minutes)

Participants will receive $40.00 in appreciation of their time.

Confidential inquiries can be made through the Anxiety Studies Division:
http://anxietystudies.uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4567, x35920
anxiety@uwaterloo.ca  


Appearance Concerns Treatment Research Study

  • Do you dislike the way any part(s) of your body (for example, your skin, hair, nose, eyes) look?
  • Do you think about your appearance for more than one hour per day?
  • Do you worry that your muscles are not big enough, or do you spend a lot of time lifting weights to enhance your muscles?
  • Do you engage in any behaviors intended to check on, hide, or fix your appearance (for example, mirror checking, comparing yourself to others, excessive grooming behaviors)?
  • Or do you avoid any places, people or activities because of your appearance concerns (for example, do you avoid bright lights, mirrors, dating, or parties)?
  • Do your appearance-related thoughts or behaviors cause you a lot of anxiety, sadness, or shame?
  • Do you have problems with your work, school, family, or friends because of your appearance concerns?

If you answered any of these questions with "yes", you might be eligible to participate in a study at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). If you qualify, you will receive the following:

  • Diagnostic Evaluation at no cost
  • Medication Treatment at no cost

You will also be asked to fill out some questionnaires assessing body image symptoms, anxiety and mood. The treatment will be at no cost for you.

If you are interested in participating or would like to get further information, please call the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Clinic at 1-877-4MGH-BDD at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), or email BDD@partners.org. Please visit our website at www.mghocd.org/bdd.


Investigating How OCD Works in the Brain

Would you be interested in helping us learn more about how OCD works in the brain? The OCD Research Clinic at the Columbia University Medical Center is conducting studies using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), measurement of the startle response, and manual and computer-based tests to learn more about the neurobiology of OCD. If you are over 18 and have OCD, you might be eligible for one or more of our current studies. For each study you choose to participate in, you will be compensated for your time. To schedule a confidential screening, contact: Jose Hernandez (646) 774-7000, or visit our website at http://www.columbia-ocd.org.


Paliperidone Study for Adults with OCD

Have you been diagnosed with a problem called Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and not responded to past medication or counseling treatment? If so, you may be eligible for a study examining if adding a medication called Paliperidone helps reduce your OCD symptoms. The Department of Psychiatry at IU School of Medicine is conducting this study.


To be eligible, you must be at least 18 years old and have problematic OCD symptoms despite having tried at least two OCD medications. If you participate in this study, you will be randomly assigned, that is by chance as in the "flip of a coin," to receive either the study medication (Paliperidone) or a sugar pill in addition to the medication you are currently taking. There will also be seven psychiatric evaluations that take place. Study medication and the evaluations will be provided at no charge. Financial compensation is available for qualified participants. Risks associated with the study will be disclosed prior to study participation.

For more information call (317) 948-0038
Posted: February 23, 2010


Does your child have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

Researchers at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research- North Shore/ Long Island Jewish Hospital are investigating the neurobiology and genetics of OCD to improve treatment methods and identify biomarkers for this disorder. This study does not provide treatment.

To participate, a child must be:

between the ages of 8-17

The study involves diagnostic interviews with both the child and one parent, some clinical measures, neuropsychological testing, an MRI exam, and an optional DNA component done through saliva collection. MRI is a safe, non-invasive neuroimaging technique (with no risk of ionizing radiation) that allows us to learn more about brain structure and function. There is no cost to you and your child will be compensated for his or her time. Participation can generally be completed in two testing sessions and scheduling is very flexible. Participants will receive up to $270 compensation.

If you are interested or have questions, please contact:

Patricia Gruner, Ph.D.

Psychiatry Research
The Zucker Hillside Hospital
75-59 263rd Street
Glen Oaks, NY 11004
Tel (718) 470-8609
Fax (718) 343-1659
pgruner@nshs.edu  


Do you have a child diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or who displays OCD symptoms?

We are looking for parents to participate in a study examining treatment history of OCD. Your responses may help in improving treatment and access to qualified professionals who can provide effective treatments to children with OCD. This is a completely anonymous survey. Please click the link below to participate in the study.

Click Here to take survey

Posted: November 10, 2009


Children and Adolescents who are Pack Rats: An Exploratory Study to Examine Compulsive Hoarding in Children and Adolescents

The aim of this study is to develop a better understanding of the onset and the clinical features of compulsive hoarding in children and adolescents. According to the limited research available on compulsive hoarding, onset of compulsive hoarding begins in childhood, and hoarding behaviors become more severe with age. Treatment with adults has demonstrated that compulsive hoarding is more resistant to traditional interventions such as medication and exposure and response prevention therapy. Very little is currently known about children and adolescents who struggle with this condition. Therefore, we are currently conducting a cross-sectional research stu dy for information that will build our knowledge base to improve intervention strategies.

Your child must be between the ages of 8-18 and have some symptoms of obsessive compulsive behaviors with hoarding. All participants will be administered a screening instrument to determine eligibility. Both the child/adolescent and one parent must be willing to participate in telephone interviews.

If eligible, participants will participate in data collection through telephone survey. The participating parent will be interviewed first by phone. Parents will complete a demographic questionnaire, an inventory, and a timeline about their child/adolescent"s behaviors. Children/adolescents will complete two inventories about their obsessive compulsive and hoarding behaviors. It is expected that the parent and child/adolescent interviews will take approximately 20-30 minutes each. Participant families will be compensated with a $20 gift card to WalMart.

To participate in this study or for further information, please contact David Dia, PhD, LCSW, CCBT at the University of Tennessee at (901) 448-4431, or email him at ddia@utk.edu. This study is approved by the University IRB.

Posted: October 14, 2009


Has Anyone Ever Called You a Packrat?

  • Have people ever commented about the amount of clutter in your home?
  • Is your home so cluttered that you have trouble using your rooms or furniture?
  • Do you have difficulty throwing things away, even when you don"t need them?

The Boston University School of Social Work is conducting a study on the nature of compulsive hoarding. The study is open to adults aged 18 and over who meet study criteria. Participants must live within a 45 minute radius of Boston, Massachusetts.

For more information, please email Andrea Kelley at aak@bu.edu or call (617) 353-5666.

Posted: October 2, 2009


Examining Specific and Core Beliefs in Body Dysmorphic and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders

You are invited to participate in a study examining specific and core beliefs in adults (18 +) with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and controls. By investigating the specific and core beliefs in BDD and OCD, this will assist in developing more tailored and effective cognitive-behavioral treatments for these sometimes debilitating disorders. By participating in this study, you will get a free diagnostic test and will help us gain insight into the cognitive nature of BDD and OCD. Any adult (18 years or older) is welcome to participate, particularly individuals with BDD or OCD diagnoses. If interested in participating or for further information please call (516) 487-7116 and ask for Agnes. You can also email her at selinger@biobehavioralinstitute.com. This study is being held at the Bio-Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY.

Posted: September 9, 2009


African-Americans with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

The University of Pennsylvania is conducting a study of African-Americans with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Recent research shows that African-Americans with OCD are not getting the most effective treatments. If you have OCD, we want to learn more about what this has been like for you and if you have ever tried to get help for your symptoms.

Participants will receive a psychological evaluation, discussion of treatment options, and $100 in compensation. The evaluation will involve completing some questionnaires and an interview with a professional clinician. No physical exam is required (i.e., no shots, needles, x-rays, or pills). Call our office at 215-746-3327 for a confidential phone screening to determine if you are eligible, and ask for Samantha Farris. You can also visit our website at http://www.black.ocdproject.org.

Not sure if you have OCD? Call our center for a phone pre-screening. You may have OCD and not even know it!

PI: Monnica Williams, Ph.D.
Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
3535 Market Street, 6th Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19104
IRB Approval: #810175

Posted: August 12, 2009

 


Assessment of Perceptual Distortions in Individuals with Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Researchers:
Jose Yaryura-Tobias, M.D.
Fugen Neziroglu, Ph.D.
Bio-Behavioral Institute
935 Northern Blvd., Suite 102
Great Neck, NY 11021
 

Researchers have hypothesized that many psychiatric disorders may affect individuals" perception. This notion has important implications for disorder etiology, maintenance, and treatment. Therefore, we are currently conducting a research study examining and comparing the visual perceptions of individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) to individuals without a psychiatric diagnosis.

Interested participants must be at least 18 years old to participate in this study. All participants will initially take part in a clinical interview to assess if they meet the study"s guidelines. Individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder or a substance use disorder will be excluded.

If eligible, participants will then have two photographs taken of themselves. Participants will then complete a computer program, which will be comparing a variety of images, including the above-mentioned photographs. Upon completing the computer program, participants will be asked to fill out a series of questionnaires. All identities and responses will be kept strictly confidential. It is expected that the study will take about 4 to 6 hours to complete. Participants will be given a break and compensated with $10.00 for lunch.

To participate in the study or for further information, please contact Melanie Santos at the Bio-Behavioral Institute at (516) 487-7116.

Posted: July 2, 2009


Tell us about your rituals! A Web-Based Study from Washington University in St. Louis

We are asking you to describe in as much detail as possible the various rituals and routines that are part of your OCD symptoms. These may consist in mental routines (counting, adding), in special ways of washing oneself or cleaning objects, in hoarding objects, checking locks and car doors, etc. Although there are many clinical studies of OCD symptoms, the description of people's rituals is often very vague. It is important for researchers to understand exactly how these rituals are organized. All this information is treated as anonymous confidential.

If you are interested in helping with this, all you have to do is answer a short questionnaire on the web, at this address: http://artsci.wustl.edu/~pboyer/RitualQuestForm.html  

For further information, you can contact Dr. Pascal Boyer at pboyer@wustl.edu.

P Boyer, Dept of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis

Posted: May 7, 2009


Neuroimaging Study of OCD at Stanford, California

We are seeking subjects with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder to participate in a research study of brain activity in OCD. The study is at Stanford University Medical Center and pays $50 for a single MRI of the brain.

Eligibility:
----Right handed men and women ages 18-65 years old
----Have OCD predominantly with contamination / washing concerns
----Free of psychiatric medications, except for anti-depressants
----No history of neurological disorders (i.e. seizure, head trauma)
----No implanted metal in your body or tattoos near your head

If you are interested in participating in this study, please call Dr. White at (650) 725-5598 or email mpwhite@stanford.edu. All calls are confidential. For general information regarding rights of research participants at Stanford , please call (650) 723-2641 or toll-free 1-866-680-2906. Thank you.

Posted: March 31, 2009


Screening Tools for Early Detection of Anxiety Disorders

Are you the parent of a 6-8 year old who has been diagnosed with OCD? If so, your child may be eligible to participate in a research study at the Infant Cognition Lab at UMass Boston. We are investigating the visual and cognitive processes of children with and without OCD as well as children at risk for OCD.

If you decide to take part in this study, your child will watch short cartoons on a computer screen while we monitor what your child pays attention to. Afterwards, we ask that you fill out a few questionnaires. The entire study will only take about 45-60 minutes and we are offering $25 and a small gift for your child as a thank you for your time.

For more information about this research study , please contact Uchenna Eneh at the Infant Cognition Lab at (617) 287-6363.

Posted: January 27, 2009

 


Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Genetics Study

Six academic institutions across the U.S. have joined together to examine the relationship between genetics and OCD. Recent advances in molecular biology and statistical genetics make it possible to identify and describe specific genes involved in complex illnesses such as OCD.

If you have been diagnosed with OCD, and have two living parents who may be available to participate in the study, you may be eligible. Participation includes a confidential interview for you, and a blood sample from you and your parents. The interview and blood draw will be scheduled at a time and location convenient for you. Compensation is available.

Your Help Counts!!  

Contact information for all sites is provided below; if you are unsure of the closest participating site, please contact Johns Hopkins University.

Posted: November 6, 2008


Study on Sensory Symptoms in Tourette Syndrome

Dr. Neal Swerdlow is trying to understand the neurological basis for Tourette symptoms. Participants will take part in a research study that examines blink responses to sound. Participants will come in one time to the lab for approximately 3 hours. A psychiatric evaluation is performed; personality questionnaires are asked. Participants need to answer a few questions to set up an appointment. Parents of participants under the age of 18 need to call and answer a few questions about their child to set up an appointment.

We are looking for males and females between the ages of 10 and 65 with a primary diagnosis of Tourette Syndrome. Participants can receive up to $40 for their time.

For more information contact:

Ashley Sutherland Owens
UCSD Medical Center, Hillcrest
San Diego, CA
Phone: (619) 543-7840
Email: ansutherland@ucsd.edu  

Posted: October 23, 2008


Study Exploring Nutritionally-Based Interventions for Non-Medicated Children with OCD

We are conducting a research study exploring the use of omega-3 fatty acids and/or B vitamins in children who have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This is exciting research that may lead to a better understanding of nutritionally-based interventions for children who are affected by OCD. Your participation is greatly appreciated!

Participation criteria includes the following:
  • Children between the ages of 6 and 17 years old
  • Primary diagnosis of OCD
  • Not currently, or within the past three months, on an SSRI or other medication for OCD
  • Not currently, or within the past three months, taking complementary or alternative substances for OCD, such as inositol, omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, 5-HTP, Valerian root, B vitamins, etc.
  • Willingness to remain medication-free for the duration of the study (1-2 months)
  • Willingness to not start, change, or discontinue current form of therapy
  • Ability to swallow large 1" capsules
Exclusions:
  • Known allergies to fish or shellfish
  • Individuals on blood thinning medication

If your child meets the eligibility criteria and is interested in participating in this research, please notify Lisa M. Bordeleau, Principal Investigator, at n3ocdresearch@aol.com. Also, feel free to contact Ms. Bordeleau if you have any questions about the study.

Posted: October 2, 2008


Online Survey on the Sleep Habits of Children

Surprisingly little is known about the typical sleep habits of children, although it has been shown that disturbed sleep behavior may exacerbate already existing problems in children. Dr. Richard Frye at the Health Science Center at Houston is inviting parents and caregivers of children to complete an online survey about their child's sleep habits. Parents are welcome to complete the survey for each child, whether or not the child has a diagnosis, and all diagnoses are welcome. This survey will help us better understand typical sleep behavior in children, and the information gathered will be invaluable in helping diagnose sleep disorders in children, and guide parents in regards to normal childhood sleep behavior.

The survey can be found here: http://www.surveymethods.com/EndUser.aspx?B195F9E1B2F3EDE3  

If you have any questions, please contact Laura deSouza at Laura.deSouza@uth.tmc.edu or (713) 500-3236.

Posted: August 8, 2008


MRI Study of Repetitive Behaviors At The Pediatric Brain Imaging Lab at the New York State Psychiatric

Has your child been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder? If so, and your child is between the ages of 4 and 13, you and your child may be eligible to participate in a 5-year research study that uses MRI to learn more about repetitive behaviors in childhood. Participation in our study will include annual visits over a 5-year period. Each study visit will require 6-7 hours of your time and include interviews, games and puzzles, and an MRI to take pictures of your child"s brain.

This is not a treatment study. Children will receive compensation for their time. For more information please call 212-543-6072 or email MRISTUDY@childpsych.columbia.edu. All calls will be kept confidential.

Posted: April 28, 2008


OCD and Hoarding Neuroimaging and Neuropsychology Studies

The Anxiety Disorders Center at the Institute of Living/Hartford Hospital is conducting studies of people with either obsessive compulsive disorder or compulsive hoarding including a neuroimaging (brain scan) study and a study examining problem solving abilities. Participants will receive $20 per hour. The studies are open to adults aged 18 to 65 who meet study criteria.

For more information please call (860) 545-7039 or email the Anxiety Disorders Center at adcresearch@harthosp.org  

Posted: April 8, 2008


Neurobiology Of Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders

Dr. Sanjaya Saxena, Director of the UCSD Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders Program, is conducting a research study to identify abnormalities of brain structure and brain function in individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders, including Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) and Compulsive Hoarding, and to determine how brain function changes with effective treatment of these disorders. This study is sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health. Study participants will receive:

  • Brain imaging, which is a way of taking pictures of brain structure and function through techniques called positron emission tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).
  • 12 weeks of free treatment with an FDA approved medication (no placebos).
  • Neuropsychological testing, which includes testing of your attention, memory, thinking, and decision-making, before and after treatment.

To participate, you must either live in or near San Diego, or be able to travel easily to our center for all procedures and treatment appointments. Participants must meet the inclusion criteria for this study.

Individuals will be excluded from participation if they:

  • Are currently taking medications that affect brain function, such as antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, antipsychotics, etc.
  • Have bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder, autism, mental retardation, or an eating disorder.
  • Have a neurological disorder, such as epilepsy, Parkinson"s disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, or dementia.
  • Have a history of chronic alcohol or substance use.
  • Weigh over 280 pounds.

There is NO monetary compensation for this study. If interested, please contact Dr. Jennifer Sumner at 858-534-8056.

Posted: January 17, 2008


Does Your Teenager Have An Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

Signs of obsessive compulsive disorder include:

  • Having unwanted ideas, impulses or images that run through their mind over and over again that could make them feel nervous and afraid.
  • Doing certain behaviours over and over again to get rid of the fear or thoughts that are making him or her uncomfortable.

We all have habits and routines in our daily lives. However, people with OCD have patterns or routines that significantly get in the way of their daily lives.

If your child's day to day life is affected by these symptoms, OCD may be the cause. New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University is looking for research volunteers (age of 12 to 17) to help find possible treatments for adolescents suffering from OCD. Your child may be eligible for a research study, which may include a clinical evaluation, medical tests, physical exam and research medication. These services are provided at no cost to you.

For more information, please call Moira Rynn, M.D. at (212) 543-4506.  

Posted: September 18, 2007


Family Genetic Study of Tourette Syndrome (TS), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

We are conducting a research study that focuses on families affected by Tourette Syndrome (TS), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and/or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We are looking for common behavioral traits, such as attentional difficulties and impulsivity, which may be shared by these conditions. If found, we want to determine whether these traits are heritable, that is, can be passed down from parents to children. We hope that the information we learn will eventually help researchers to develop better treatments for these conditions.

We are enrolling families in which there is at least one child between 6 to 21 years old who has TS, ADHD and/or OCD, or any combination of these conditions. We would like the whole family (both parents, brothers and sisters) to participate. Subjects will complete interviews, questionnaires and assessments examining areas such as attention, impulsivity, problem-solving, visual-spatial skills and sensory sensitivity. We will also collect a blood or saliva sample for DNA testing. Study participation is strictly voluntary and may require 3-6 hours per person for the completion of all study tasks. Study visits can be at MGH or in your own home. Families coming to MGH will have parking and meal expenses paid for them. Upon completion of all study tasks, families will be paid $100 for their participation.

If your family meets these criteria and you are interested in learning more about this study, please call the Genetic Family Study at 1-800-471-2730, option 2 or email cillmann@partners.org. Please visit our website at www.ts-adhd-ocd.org.

Posted: August 14, 2007


Research Survey About Repetitive Behaviors in Children With OCD

Help us understand more about the repetitive behaviors exhibited by children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)!  

The University of Alabama Psychology Department is beginning a new study of repetitive behaviors in children and adolescents with OCD as part of a graduate student dissertation. We are interested in families with children between the ages of 7 and 17 years of age. This study examines repetitive behaviors, social interactions, and fears or worries in children with OCD and will provide valuable information for future research and clinical interventions with families of children with OCD. For example, the results from this project may be applied to developing individual and group interventions for children and adolescents with OCD.

Participation involves completing a 30-minute telephone interview and then filling out an internet-based survey regarding your child"s behavior, which will take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete. You will receive an ID number and password for the internet-based survey and may complete it at your convenience. Once you have completed the survey, you will receive a $5 gift certificate to a major bookstore in your area as a thank you for your time.

If you are interested in participating in this study, please contact Michelle DeRamus, a graduate student supervised by Dr. Laura Klinger, at (205) 348-9312 or by email at repetitivebehaviors@gmail.com for more information.

Posted: August 14, 2007


OCD, BDD, Hoarding Study

The UCSD Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Program is looking for people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), and Compulsive Hoarding to take part in a study that is providing:

  1. 12 weeks free medication treatment
  2. Brain imaging scans (PET & MRI)
  3. Diagnostic Evaluation
  4. Neuropsychological Evaluation

For more information call Dr. Jennifer Sumner at (858) 334-4638

Posted: August 14, 2007


Study of Perception in BDD and OCD

Dr. Fugen Neziroglu and Dr. Yaryura-Tobias at the Bio-Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY are studying differences in perception between people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, and healthy controls, especially with regard to appearance related perception. Greater understanding of perception in these populations could aid in designing therapies that better target the factors that contribute to the disorders. Participation is open to anyone with OCD or BDD, or without any psychiatric diagnosis. Participants need to allow us to photograph them. Participants receive feedback as well as compensation .

Information: The Bio-Behavioral Institute is located in Great Neck on Long Island, NY.

For more information or to sign up, call and speak with Natalie or Jonathan at (516) 487-7116. Information is also available on our website: http://www.biobehavioralinstitute.com.

Posted: May 25, 2007


Do you suffer from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

Participants Wanted! Research Study on the Effectiveness of Duloxetine (Cymbaltatm) In Treating Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Dr. Darin Dougherty of the Massachusetts General Hospital OCD Clinic and Research Unit is conducting a research study on the use of duloxetine (Cymbaltatm) to reduce the symptoms associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). If you have OCD, you may be eligible to participate in this study. To be eligible you must:

  • be between 18-65 years old.
  • live within 1 hour of Boston.
  • be able to participate for 17 weeks.
  • not be pregnant or breastfeeding.

If you are interested in this study and believe you are eligible, please contact Johanna Thompson-Hollands at (617) 726-9281.

Posted: March 13, 2007


Long-term Follow-Up Family Study of Children at Risk for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Do you or one of your family members suffer from unwanted thoughts, worries and behaviors that they can't stop? Or, is there someone in your family who has been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)? Is there a child under 9 years old in your family who does not have OCD?

If you answered yes to these questions, we would like to ask you to become a part of a family research study at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The purpose of this study is to find the causes of OCD. Families who take part in this study will receive a psychological evaluation at no cost. Families will be given feedback about some of the tests given to the children. We will also want to collect a DNA sample and take a picture (MRI) of your brain.

This study will require 6 hours of your time per year. Compensation will be provided for you and your family.

If you are interested, please call (617) 643-3074 to get more information.

*This research is financed by the McIngvales' grant to Massachusetts General Hospital.

Posted: December 13, 2006


Aripiprazole Augmentation of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors
for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Alexander Bystritsky, M.D., Ph.D., Principal Investigator,
and Jamie Feusner, M.D., Co-investigator
UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
300 Medical Plaza, Room 2200
Los Angeles, CA 90024

  • Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are the first-line medication treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Approximately 43-60% of those treated with SRIs alone will have a response. With such a modest response rate and relatively low average reduction of symptoms (23-43%), additional medications are often needed in the treatment of OCD as most will fall into the categories of either "non-responder" or "partial-responder."

Several studies have shown benefit from adding medications called atypical neuroleptics to SRIs in people with OCD who have not responded to SRIs alone. (Atypical neuroleptics are medications which block the brain chemicals dopamine and serotonin, and include aripiprazole (Abilifytm), olanzapine (Zyprexatm), risperidone (Risperdaltm), quetiapine (Seroqueltm), and ziprasidone (Geodontm).

In this study we are investigating augmentation of an SRI with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole (Abilifytm) in a group of OCD patients, whether or not they are "non-responders." This will allow us to determine both the effects of aripiprazole and whether the combination of an atypical antipsychotic and an SRI produces a more robust improvement, in a broader OCD population, than an SRI alone. Such information may significantly impact the standard of clinical care for OCD patients.

Subjects in this study will randomly be assigned to receive either aripiprazole (Abilifytm) or placebo in addition to their existing SRI medication for 18 weeks. Subjects will be evaluated every 2 weeks, and doses will be increased as tolerated and as needed. After the 18 weeks subjects will be assisted in finding referrals for continuing their treatment if effective, or finding other forms of treatment. The study medication will be provided free-of-charge, and subjects will be paid for their participation. If you are interested in participating in the study, or finding out more about it, please call: (310) 794-1038.